Abstract Title

Chronic Pain Conditions as a Moderator between Pain Catastrophizing and Cognitive Functioning

Abstract

This study sought to investigate the relationship between cognitive functioning and chronic pain conditions in individuals seeking detoxification treatment. Previous research suggests that individuals with a chronic pain condition demonstrate neuropsychological impairment in attentional capacity and processing speed (Hart, Martelli, & Zasler, 2000). Pain catastrophizing has been found to predict the likelihood of cognitive complaints in participants with a diagnosed chronic pain condition (Roth, Geisser, Theisen-Goodvich, & Dixon, 2005). Further research suggests that those who self-report more somatic awareness have worse cognitive performance (Eccleston, Crombez, Aldrich, & Stannard, 1997). This study hypothesizes that having a chronic pain condition will moderate the relationship between pain catastrophizing and cognitive functioning, such that those with a chronic pain condition will demonstrate a stronger negative relationship compared to those without a chronic pain condition. Pain catastrophizing is assessed using the Pain Catastrophizing Scale and cognitive functioning is evaluated using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), which includes measures of immediate memory, visuospatial/constructional skills, attention, and delayed memory. At this point, data analyses are still ongoing and results will be provided at the poster presentation.

Modified Abstract

This study sought to investigate the relationship between cognition and chronic pain conditions in individuals seeking detoxification treatment. Previous research suggests that individuals with a chronic pain condition demonstrate neuropsychological impairment in attentional capacity and processing speed (Hart, Martelli, & Zasler, 2000). Pain catastrophizing has been found to predict the likelihood of cognitive complaints in participants with a chronic pain condition (Roth, Geisser, Theisen-Goodvich, & Dixon, 2005). Further research suggests that those who self-report more somatic awareness have worse cognitive performance (Eccleston, Crombez, Aldrich, & Stannard, 1997). This study hypothesizes that having a chronic pain condition will moderate the relationship between pain catastrophizing and cognitive functioning, such that those with a chronic pain condition will demonstrate a stronger negative relationship compared to those without a chronic pain condition. Pain catastrophizing is assessed using the Pain Catastrophizing Scale and cognitive functioning is evaluated using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS).

Research Category

Psychology

Primary Author's Major

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Monica

Garcia

Mentor #2 Information

Dr. Douglas

Delahanty

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

April 2019

Research Area

Cognitive Psychology

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

Chronic Pain Conditions as a Moderator between Pain Catastrophizing and Cognitive Functioning

This study sought to investigate the relationship between cognitive functioning and chronic pain conditions in individuals seeking detoxification treatment. Previous research suggests that individuals with a chronic pain condition demonstrate neuropsychological impairment in attentional capacity and processing speed (Hart, Martelli, & Zasler, 2000). Pain catastrophizing has been found to predict the likelihood of cognitive complaints in participants with a diagnosed chronic pain condition (Roth, Geisser, Theisen-Goodvich, & Dixon, 2005). Further research suggests that those who self-report more somatic awareness have worse cognitive performance (Eccleston, Crombez, Aldrich, & Stannard, 1997). This study hypothesizes that having a chronic pain condition will moderate the relationship between pain catastrophizing and cognitive functioning, such that those with a chronic pain condition will demonstrate a stronger negative relationship compared to those without a chronic pain condition. Pain catastrophizing is assessed using the Pain Catastrophizing Scale and cognitive functioning is evaluated using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), which includes measures of immediate memory, visuospatial/constructional skills, attention, and delayed memory. At this point, data analyses are still ongoing and results will be provided at the poster presentation.