Abstract Title

Longitudinal Correlation Between Cognitive Decline in Multiple Sclerosis and Rise in Depressive Symptoms

Abstract

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system caused by inflammation and progressive demyelination, causing biological and psychological issues. Up to 65% of MS patients have cognitive dysfunction that significantly affects their ability to function, and this negatively impacts employment and sociability than cognitively intact MS patients suffering from physical ailments. (Wilken et al., 2003). This disengagement from social activities and employment could be because MS is associated with high rates of depression. The lifetime prevalence for depression in MS is 50% and the annual prevalence of 20% which are very high. (Siegert and Abernethy, 2005). We want to determine how damage to executive planning by MS impacts the level of depression over time. We examined a sample of recently diagnosed patients with MS over the course of 18 months. We tested their cognition with the Tower Puzzle from the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics which measures executive planning. This test was administered at 1 and 13 months. We used the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale to test the level of depression symptoms. We will use a within-subject t-test to determine if there is a sample-wide difference in performance on the Tower Puzzle; then, we will use a correlation to test if change in the tower score is associated with depression symptoms that were measured with the CES-D scale. This research will help patients that need more support because we will understand how the damage MS does to executive planning may impact future mental illness.

Modified Abstract

Up to 65% of Multiple Sclerosis patients have cognitive dysfunction that significantly affects their ability to function. We want to determine how damage to executive planning by MS impacts the level of depression. We examined a sample of recently diagnosed patients with MS over the course of 18 months. We tested their cognition and level of depressive symptoms with the Tower Puzzle from the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale respectively. We will use a within-subject t-test to determine if there is a sample-wide difference in performance on the Tower Puzzle; then, we will use a correlation to test if change in the tower score is associated with depression symptoms that were measured with the CES-D scale.

Research Category

Psychology

Author Information

Desiree BechtolFollow

Primary Author's Major

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Karin

Coifman

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

April 2019

Research Area

Clinical Psychology

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

Longitudinal Correlation Between Cognitive Decline in Multiple Sclerosis and Rise in Depressive Symptoms

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system caused by inflammation and progressive demyelination, causing biological and psychological issues. Up to 65% of MS patients have cognitive dysfunction that significantly affects their ability to function, and this negatively impacts employment and sociability than cognitively intact MS patients suffering from physical ailments. (Wilken et al., 2003). This disengagement from social activities and employment could be because MS is associated with high rates of depression. The lifetime prevalence for depression in MS is 50% and the annual prevalence of 20% which are very high. (Siegert and Abernethy, 2005). We want to determine how damage to executive planning by MS impacts the level of depression over time. We examined a sample of recently diagnosed patients with MS over the course of 18 months. We tested their cognition with the Tower Puzzle from the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics which measures executive planning. This test was administered at 1 and 13 months. We used the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale to test the level of depression symptoms. We will use a within-subject t-test to determine if there is a sample-wide difference in performance on the Tower Puzzle; then, we will use a correlation to test if change in the tower score is associated with depression symptoms that were measured with the CES-D scale. This research will help patients that need more support because we will understand how the damage MS does to executive planning may impact future mental illness.