Abstract Title

The Effect of Heat Exposure on the Inflammatory Response during Exercise

Abstract

The Effect of Heat Exposure on the Inflammatory Response during Exercise

Jessica Sankovic1, Kylene Boka1, Jeremiah A. Vaughan1,2, Brittany N. Followay1,3, Ellen L. Glickman1, Adam R. Jajtner1

1Exercise Physiology Program, Kent State University, Kent, OH

2Department of Human Performance, Sport and Health, Bemidji State University, Bemidji, MN

3Exercise Science Department, Ripon College, Ripon, WI

PURPOSE: Examine circulating levels of IL-6, IL-10, IL-1ra and TNF-α during exercise and heat exposure. METHODS: Twelve college-aged men completed three experimental conditions; VO2max test and cycling trials in 22°C (MT) and 35°C (HT). Cycling trials consisted of 60 minutes at 60% VO2max, 15-minute rest, time to exhaustion at 90% VO2max, and 60-minute recovery. Blood was analyzed for concentrations of IL-6, IL-10, IL1-ra and TNF-α before exercise (Pre), after 60% VO2max (60), 90% VO2max (90), and recovery (Rec). Data were analyzed with repeated-measures ANOVA. RESULTS: An interaction was observed for IL-6 (F=5.883, p=0.003, ηp2= 0.395), with significant increases from Pre to 60 to 90, and return to baseline at Rec for both conditions (pp2=0.340), with increases from Pre to 90 for both conditions (pp2=0.636) and condition (F=9.539. p=0.011, ηp2=0.488) were observed for IL-1ra, with greater IL-1ra concentrations in HT than MT (p=0.011), and increases from Pre, 60, and 90 to Rec (pp2=0.337) was observed, with increases from PRE in HT (pCONCLUSIONS: The increase of these cytokines during exercise indicates activation of the inflammatory response. The response of IL-6, IL-10, and IL-1ra to heat exposure suggests the exercise-induced anti-inflammatory response is greater than a pro-inflammatory response to the heat.

Modified Abstract

The Effect of Heat Exposure on the Inflammatory Response during Exercise

Jessica Sankovic1, Kylene Boka1, Jeremiah A. Vaughan1,2, Brittany N. Followay1,3, Ellen L. Glickman1, Adam R. Jajtner1

1Exercise Physiology Program, Kent State University, Kent, OH

2Department of Human Performance, Sport and Health, Bemidji State University, Bemidji, MN

3Exercise Science Department, Ripon College, Ripon, WI

PURPOSE: Examine post-exercise (35ºC) circulating IL-6, IL-10, IL-1ra and TNF-α. METHODS: Twelve men cycled 60min at 60%VO2max, and to exhaustion at 90%VO2max in 22°C and 35°C. Blood was analyzed at Pre, after 60% (60), after 90% (90), and after 1-hour recovery (Rec). RESULTS: IL-6 increased from Pre to 60 and 90 in both conditions. Concentrations were greater in HT vs MT at 60 and Rec. IL-10 increased from Pre to 90 in both conditions, and was higher in HT than MT at Rec. IL-1ra increased from Pre, 60, and 90 to Rec in both conditions. All concentrations were higher in HT than MT. TNF-α increased across time in HT. CONCLUSIONS: The cytokine response suggests a greater anti- than pro-inflammatory response to exercise in the heat.

Research Category

Social Science/Education/Public Health

Primary Author's Major

Exercise Science

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Kylene

Boka

Mentor #2 Information

Dr. Adam

Jajtner

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

April 2019

Research Area

Exercise Physiology | Exercise Science

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

The Effect of Heat Exposure on the Inflammatory Response during Exercise

The Effect of Heat Exposure on the Inflammatory Response during Exercise

Jessica Sankovic1, Kylene Boka1, Jeremiah A. Vaughan1,2, Brittany N. Followay1,3, Ellen L. Glickman1, Adam R. Jajtner1

1Exercise Physiology Program, Kent State University, Kent, OH

2Department of Human Performance, Sport and Health, Bemidji State University, Bemidji, MN

3Exercise Science Department, Ripon College, Ripon, WI

PURPOSE: Examine circulating levels of IL-6, IL-10, IL-1ra and TNF-α during exercise and heat exposure. METHODS: Twelve college-aged men completed three experimental conditions; VO2max test and cycling trials in 22°C (MT) and 35°C (HT). Cycling trials consisted of 60 minutes at 60% VO2max, 15-minute rest, time to exhaustion at 90% VO2max, and 60-minute recovery. Blood was analyzed for concentrations of IL-6, IL-10, IL1-ra and TNF-α before exercise (Pre), after 60% VO2max (60), 90% VO2max (90), and recovery (Rec). Data were analyzed with repeated-measures ANOVA. RESULTS: An interaction was observed for IL-6 (F=5.883, p=0.003, ηp2= 0.395), with significant increases from Pre to 60 to 90, and return to baseline at Rec for both conditions (pp2=0.340), with increases from Pre to 90 for both conditions (pp2=0.636) and condition (F=9.539. p=0.011, ηp2=0.488) were observed for IL-1ra, with greater IL-1ra concentrations in HT than MT (p=0.011), and increases from Pre, 60, and 90 to Rec (pp2=0.337) was observed, with increases from PRE in HT (pCONCLUSIONS: The increase of these cytokines during exercise indicates activation of the inflammatory response. The response of IL-6, IL-10, and IL-1ra to heat exposure suggests the exercise-induced anti-inflammatory response is greater than a pro-inflammatory response to the heat.