Abstract Title

History’s View of Denise Scott Brown

Abstract

Much of architectural history is dominated by male figures which begs the

question whether the disregard of women is due to their lack of production, or to a

more nefarious gender bias among architectural historians. Denise Scott Brown, who is

an American architect and principal at the firm Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates,

presents one such case. Together with her husband Venturi, as well as alone, she has

authored many of the most significant texts and buildings in postward architectures.

However, historians often attribute these texts and buildings solely to Venturi. This

provides an interesting opportunity to take a critical look at how historians present and

understand the contributions of women to architectural production and discourse in

comparison to their male partners.

This paper will explore how different historiographic accounts credit and talk

about the work produced by Denise Scott Brown and Robert Venturi, both together

and independently, in order to ascertain whether historians have undervalued Denise

Scott Brown’s work. It will analyze historiographic accounts including William Curtis’

Modern Architecture Since 1900 , Kenneth Frampton’s M odern Architecture: A Critical

History , and more recent articles on their work. Original writings by Scott Brown and

Venturi will also be analyzed, including L earning from Las Vegas (1972, Venturi,Scott

Brown) and Learning from Pop (1972, Scott Brown) in order to develop a deeper

understanding of their perspectives and what they each contributed to the projects

mentioned.

Modified Abstract

Much of architectural history is dominated by male figures which begs the question whether the disregard of women is due to their lack of production, or to a more nefarious gender bias among architectural historians. Denise Scott Brown, who is an American architect and principal at the firm Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates, presents one such case. Together with her husband Venturi, as well as alone, she has authored many of the most significant texts and buildings in postward architectures. However, historians often attribute these texts and buildings solely to Venturi. This provides an interesting opportunity to take a critical look at how historians present and understand the contributions of women to architectural production and discourse in comparison to their male partners.

Research Category

Architecture

Primary Author's Major

Architectural Studies

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Brett

Tippey

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

April 2019

Research Area

Architectural History and Criticism

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History’s View of Denise Scott Brown

Much of architectural history is dominated by male figures which begs the

question whether the disregard of women is due to their lack of production, or to a

more nefarious gender bias among architectural historians. Denise Scott Brown, who is

an American architect and principal at the firm Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates,

presents one such case. Together with her husband Venturi, as well as alone, she has

authored many of the most significant texts and buildings in postward architectures.

However, historians often attribute these texts and buildings solely to Venturi. This

provides an interesting opportunity to take a critical look at how historians present and

understand the contributions of women to architectural production and discourse in

comparison to their male partners.

This paper will explore how different historiographic accounts credit and talk

about the work produced by Denise Scott Brown and Robert Venturi, both together

and independently, in order to ascertain whether historians have undervalued Denise

Scott Brown’s work. It will analyze historiographic accounts including William Curtis’

Modern Architecture Since 1900 , Kenneth Frampton’s M odern Architecture: A Critical

History , and more recent articles on their work. Original writings by Scott Brown and

Venturi will also be analyzed, including L earning from Las Vegas (1972, Venturi,Scott

Brown) and Learning from Pop (1972, Scott Brown) in order to develop a deeper

understanding of their perspectives and what they each contributed to the projects

mentioned.