Abstract Title

Were Late Woodland triangular flaked stone arrow tips from Ohio, U.S.A. designed for wound size or target penetration?

Abstract

An experimental model derived from ballistics tests has recently shown that the size of a flaked stone arrowhead significantly influences how well an arrow penetrates a target. Namely, the smaller the arrowhead, the deeper the penetration. However, large arrowheads have advantages too: they cause bigger wounds. I collected morphometric data from hundreds of arrowheads across Ohio to see whether they fall on the smaller, or larger, end of the experimental model to understand whether prehistoric hunters were more concerned with target penetration or wound size.

Modified Abstract

An experimental model derived from ballistics tests has recently shown that the size of a flaked stone arrowhead significantly influences how well an arrow penetrates a target. Namely, the smaller the arrowhead, the deeper the penetration. However, large arrowheads have advantages too: they cause bigger wounds. I collected morphometric data from hundreds of arrowheads across Ohio to see whether they fall on the smaller, or larger, end of the experimental model to understand whether prehistoric hunters were more concerned with target penetration or wound size.

Research Category

Social Science/Education/Public Health

Primary Author's Major

Anthropology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Metin

Eren

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

April 2019

Research Area

Archaeological Anthropology

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

Were Late Woodland triangular flaked stone arrow tips from Ohio, U.S.A. designed for wound size or target penetration?

An experimental model derived from ballistics tests has recently shown that the size of a flaked stone arrowhead significantly influences how well an arrow penetrates a target. Namely, the smaller the arrowhead, the deeper the penetration. However, large arrowheads have advantages too: they cause bigger wounds. I collected morphometric data from hundreds of arrowheads across Ohio to see whether they fall on the smaller, or larger, end of the experimental model to understand whether prehistoric hunters were more concerned with target penetration or wound size.