Abstract Title

Pluviophile

Abstract

Pluviophile: A Lover of Rain

Natalie Mills, Maya Efrat, and Margaret Busche

Kent State University

Key Words: Transformable, Weather-proof, Cotton, Contemporary

Design Statement

The purpose of this project was to create a cohesive collection based upon business plans created by Kent State University Sophomore Merchandising students. The business plan the designers chose was called Cotton the Rain. The business plan proposed “developing a new look for the raincoat through environmentally friendly approaches and to encourage consumers to be eco-friendly shoppers.” The ‘company’s’ mission statement is to “reduce waste of cotton and to use environmentally friendly dyes to produce sustainable, high quality raincoats and jackets.” We incorporated these practices by using one-hundred percent organic cotton fabrics. The garments created in this collection were designed to transform either within itself or into varying sizes of bags. This design project shows the designers interest in the ways of transformable and functional garments while remaining a contemporary design aesthetic. Through this design process, designers were able to create a fresh take on weather-proof garments through sustainable fabrics and creative uses of hardware.

Cotton the Rain features rain jackets that use a multitude of vibrant colors to allow freedom of self expression. The jackets are made of one-hundred percent organic cotton as a way to make these garments sustainable. According to Sarah Kennedy (2015), “organic cotton has a 98% lower water pollution rate than the non-organic alternatives.” The seeds of organic cotton are “GMO-free and not treated with hazardous synthetic fertilizers. This means organic cotton farming actually produces 94% less greenhouse gam emissions” (Kennedy, 2015). Organic cotton can only be considered one-hundred percent organic as long as the soil and fertilizers are considered organic and natural. That being said “organic soil becomes a ‘carbon sink’,which removes CO2 from the atmosphere,” meaning organic cotton reduces the carbon footprint (Kennedy, 2015). Through the use of organic cotton the rain jackets will be sustainable.

The three designers each had a different approach to the transformable aspect of their garments. Natalie Mills wanted to go an entirely different route from her fellow designers. She created a jacket that could be worn two ways: as a dress or an outer garment. Not only that, but the jacket can collapse within itself through a kangaroo pocket that features another pocket that can be closed with a reversible zipper. Margaret Busche’s knit top with drawstrings is zero waste. It can be worn oversized or if the drawstrings are pulled the silhouette becomes more fitted. The jeans have a separating zipper in the lower leg so that they can become culottes. For convenience, the jacket can transform into a hobo style bag. The bottom zips together to create the bag and the sleeves snap together to create the strap. Through the use of snap, the jacket's hood is also detachable. The first garment Maya Efrat designed for this collection is a white corduroy dress with an invisible zipper closure in the center back seam and a drawstring at the hem to give it more of a balloon shape if desired. The second garment is a two-toned denim jacket that separates to create a cropped jacket and a bucket bag also using a drawstring. The two parts are connected with snaps.

Kennedy, S. (2015, September 09). Which Big Brands are Using More Organic Cotton? Retrieved October 10, 2018, from https://goodonyou.eco/big-brands-are-using-more-organic-cotton/

Modified Abstract

The purpose of this project was to create a cohesive collection based upon business plans created by Kent State University Sophomore Merchandising students. The business plan the designers chose was called Cotton the Rain. The business plan proposed “developing a new look for the raincoat through environmentally friendly approaches and to encourage consumers to be eco-friendly shoppers.” The ‘company’s’ mission statement is to “reduce waste of cotton and to use environmentally friendly dyes to produce sustainable, high quality raincoats and jackets.” We incorporated these practices by using one-hundred percent organic cotton fabrics. The garments created in this collection were designed to transform either within itself or into varying sizes of bags. This design project shows the designers interest in the ways of transformable and functional garments while remaining a contemporary design aesthetic. Through this design process, designers were able to create a fresh take on weather-proof garments through sustainable fabrics and creative uses of hardware.

Research Category

Art/Fashion

Primary Author's Major

Fashion Design

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Hwang

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

April 2019

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

Pluviophile

Pluviophile: A Lover of Rain

Natalie Mills, Maya Efrat, and Margaret Busche

Kent State University

Key Words: Transformable, Weather-proof, Cotton, Contemporary

Design Statement

The purpose of this project was to create a cohesive collection based upon business plans created by Kent State University Sophomore Merchandising students. The business plan the designers chose was called Cotton the Rain. The business plan proposed “developing a new look for the raincoat through environmentally friendly approaches and to encourage consumers to be eco-friendly shoppers.” The ‘company’s’ mission statement is to “reduce waste of cotton and to use environmentally friendly dyes to produce sustainable, high quality raincoats and jackets.” We incorporated these practices by using one-hundred percent organic cotton fabrics. The garments created in this collection were designed to transform either within itself or into varying sizes of bags. This design project shows the designers interest in the ways of transformable and functional garments while remaining a contemporary design aesthetic. Through this design process, designers were able to create a fresh take on weather-proof garments through sustainable fabrics and creative uses of hardware.

Cotton the Rain features rain jackets that use a multitude of vibrant colors to allow freedom of self expression. The jackets are made of one-hundred percent organic cotton as a way to make these garments sustainable. According to Sarah Kennedy (2015), “organic cotton has a 98% lower water pollution rate than the non-organic alternatives.” The seeds of organic cotton are “GMO-free and not treated with hazardous synthetic fertilizers. This means organic cotton farming actually produces 94% less greenhouse gam emissions” (Kennedy, 2015). Organic cotton can only be considered one-hundred percent organic as long as the soil and fertilizers are considered organic and natural. That being said “organic soil becomes a ‘carbon sink’,which removes CO2 from the atmosphere,” meaning organic cotton reduces the carbon footprint (Kennedy, 2015). Through the use of organic cotton the rain jackets will be sustainable.

The three designers each had a different approach to the transformable aspect of their garments. Natalie Mills wanted to go an entirely different route from her fellow designers. She created a jacket that could be worn two ways: as a dress or an outer garment. Not only that, but the jacket can collapse within itself through a kangaroo pocket that features another pocket that can be closed with a reversible zipper. Margaret Busche’s knit top with drawstrings is zero waste. It can be worn oversized or if the drawstrings are pulled the silhouette becomes more fitted. The jeans have a separating zipper in the lower leg so that they can become culottes. For convenience, the jacket can transform into a hobo style bag. The bottom zips together to create the bag and the sleeves snap together to create the strap. Through the use of snap, the jacket's hood is also detachable. The first garment Maya Efrat designed for this collection is a white corduroy dress with an invisible zipper closure in the center back seam and a drawstring at the hem to give it more of a balloon shape if desired. The second garment is a two-toned denim jacket that separates to create a cropped jacket and a bucket bag also using a drawstring. The two parts are connected with snaps.

Kennedy, S. (2015, September 09). Which Big Brands are Using More Organic Cotton? Retrieved October 10, 2018, from https://goodonyou.eco/big-brands-are-using-more-organic-cotton/