Abstract Title

Does stream restoration BUG or build invertebrate diversity?

Abstract

As the aesthetic and economic values of streams become increasingly recognized, restoration efforts of riparian zones and stream channels are consequently becoming more common. Typical restoration efforts include activities such as adding rocks to enhance substrate heterogeneity and planting vegetation to promote stream-bank stability, as well as create more niches for organisms to utilize. Stream restoration aims to improve overall diversity of aquatic and streamside invertebrate communities. However, typical measures of restoration success often focus solely on aquatic invertebrate communities while riparian communities are also likely influenced by the changes to their environment. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine how stream restoration affects diversity and structure of invertebrate communities. We hypothesized that the riparian zones of restored streams would have higher invertebrate diversity and richness than unrestored and natural stream riparian zones due to the present goal of streams to promote diversity of plants, insects, and animals in the area. However, we further hypothesized that restored riparian zones would have lower invertebrate abundance as they have had a less time to establish a community. Streams in this study were examined in the Geauga and Cleveland Metroparks areas. We sampled invertebrate communities using pitfall traps placed along the side of the stream banks and over 140 samples were collected altogether. Results thus far have shown no major differences in abundances of invertebrates between each stream type, but there are still many samples to be sorted and we are hoping to find more interesting results in the near future.

Modified Abstract

As the aesthetic and economic values of streams become increasingly recognized, restoration efforts of riparian zones and stream channels are becoming more common. Stream restoration aims to improve diversity of aquatic and streamside invertebrate communities, which ultimately affects riparian communities due to changes to their environment. This study examined how stream restoration affects diversity and structure of riparian invertebrate communities. We hypothesized that invertebrate diversity and richness would be higher in restored stream zones while abundance would be lower. We sampled communities using pitfall traps placed along the sides of the stream banks. Results show no significant differences in overall abundance and species richness of communities between each stream type; instead, there are significant differences in these factors between each sampling site (AB,ACACIA,OH).

Research Category

Biology/Ecology

Author Information

Lataisha JonesFollow

Primary Author's Major

Zoology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Ferenc

de Szalay

Mentor #2 Information

EmmaLeigh

Given

Start Date

April 2019

Research Area

Biology | Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

Does stream restoration BUG or build invertebrate diversity?

As the aesthetic and economic values of streams become increasingly recognized, restoration efforts of riparian zones and stream channels are consequently becoming more common. Typical restoration efforts include activities such as adding rocks to enhance substrate heterogeneity and planting vegetation to promote stream-bank stability, as well as create more niches for organisms to utilize. Stream restoration aims to improve overall diversity of aquatic and streamside invertebrate communities. However, typical measures of restoration success often focus solely on aquatic invertebrate communities while riparian communities are also likely influenced by the changes to their environment. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine how stream restoration affects diversity and structure of invertebrate communities. We hypothesized that the riparian zones of restored streams would have higher invertebrate diversity and richness than unrestored and natural stream riparian zones due to the present goal of streams to promote diversity of plants, insects, and animals in the area. However, we further hypothesized that restored riparian zones would have lower invertebrate abundance as they have had a less time to establish a community. Streams in this study were examined in the Geauga and Cleveland Metroparks areas. We sampled invertebrate communities using pitfall traps placed along the side of the stream banks and over 140 samples were collected altogether. Results thus far have shown no major differences in abundances of invertebrates between each stream type, but there are still many samples to be sorted and we are hoping to find more interesting results in the near future.