Abstract Title

The Re-Invention of the American Worker: Race, Masculinity, and the Decline of Unions in the U.S., 1964-1982

Abstract

The decline of unions from the years 1964 has often been attributed to external forces such as anti-union culture among growing corporations, hostile legal and political policy, or the natural progression of globalization as its’ effects hampered union presence and influence. However, another significant facet of union decline is the rapid deterioration of the concept of solidarity within the union apparatus as the union demographic began to change. As union identity underwent transitioning from a collective consciousness to an individual-rights based consciousness, fragmentation permeated the union structure, weakening its’ efficacy during turbulent social and economic years. This fragmentation is most represented in the change of identity in the white male union worker, abandoning the democratic platform, and back lashing against the elevated social status of women and minorities.

Modified Abstract

The decline of unions from the years 1964 has often been attributed to external forces such as anti-union culture among growing corporations, hostile legal and political policy, or the natural progression of globalization as its’ effects hampered union presence and influence. However, another significant facet of union decline is the rapid deterioration of the concept of solidarity within the union apparatus as the union demographic began to change. As union identity underwent transitioning from a collective consciousness to an individual-rights based consciousness, fragmentation permeated the union structure, weakening its’ efficacy during turbulent social and economic years. This fragmentation is most represented in the change of identity in the white male union worker, abandoning the democratic platform, and back lashing against the elevated social status of women and minorities.

Research Category

Political Sciences/Philosophy/History

Author Information

Sean KellarFollow

Primary Author's Major

History

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Matthew

Crawford

Start Date

April 2019

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

The Re-Invention of the American Worker: Race, Masculinity, and the Decline of Unions in the U.S., 1964-1982

The decline of unions from the years 1964 has often been attributed to external forces such as anti-union culture among growing corporations, hostile legal and political policy, or the natural progression of globalization as its’ effects hampered union presence and influence. However, another significant facet of union decline is the rapid deterioration of the concept of solidarity within the union apparatus as the union demographic began to change. As union identity underwent transitioning from a collective consciousness to an individual-rights based consciousness, fragmentation permeated the union structure, weakening its’ efficacy during turbulent social and economic years. This fragmentation is most represented in the change of identity in the white male union worker, abandoning the democratic platform, and back lashing against the elevated social status of women and minorities.