Abstract

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that often leads to increased incidence of depression. Although high cadence cycling improves motor function in PD, depression could decrease motivation to participate in exercise. PURPOSE: To examine if three bouts of high-cadence cycling improves symptoms of depression in individuals with PD. METHODS: Individuals with PD (N=32) were divided into either a high-cadence cycling or a no-exercise (control) group. The cycling group completed three sessions of high cadence cycling, on a custom motorized stationary cycle, consisting of a 5-minute warm-up at 50 revolutions per minute (rpm), 30 minutes of high cadence cycling between 75-85 rpm, and a 5-minute cool down. Depression was assessed using Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) at baseline and 1 week later. BDI-II is a 21-question self-assessment that examines feelings of hopelessness, irritability and fatigue. RESULTS: At baseline, 31% of the individuals showed symptoms of depression. Overall, there were no significant changes in BDI scores after the intervention. However, not all of the subjects recruited had depression according to the BDI. Individuals who showed symptoms of depression (BDI score > 13) improved their depression score by 4.67 points after high-cadence cycling and the control group only improved by 2.75 points. CONCLUSIONS: Although three high-cadence cycling sessions did not result in significant improvements in BDI-II, it is possible that additional sessions of high-cadence cycling will promote further improvements in depression amongst individuals with PD. Future studies should examine the effects of additional cycling sessions on depression in this high-risk population.

Modified Abstract

PURPOSE: To examine if three bouts of high-cadence cycling improves symptoms of depression in individuals with PD. METHODS: Individuals with PD were divided into either a high-cadence cycling or a control group. The cycling group completed three sessions of high cadence cycling. Depression was assessed using Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) at baseline and 1 week later. RESULTS: Overall, there were no significant changes in BDI scores after the intervention. Only the individuals who showed symptoms of depression (BDI score > 13) improved their depression score after high-cadence cycling. CONCLUSIONS: Although three high-cadence cycling sessions did not result in significant improvements in BDI-II, it is possible that additional sessions of high-cadence cycling will promote further improvements in depression amongst individuals with PD.

Research Category

Biomedical Sciences

Primary Author's Major

Exercise Science

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Angela

Ridgel

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

April 2019

Research Area

Musculoskeletal, Neural, and Ocular Physiology | Neurosciences

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

Does High Cadence Cycling Improve Symptoms Of Depression In Individuals With Parksinson's Disease?

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that often leads to increased incidence of depression. Although high cadence cycling improves motor function in PD, depression could decrease motivation to participate in exercise. PURPOSE: To examine if three bouts of high-cadence cycling improves symptoms of depression in individuals with PD. METHODS: Individuals with PD (N=32) were divided into either a high-cadence cycling or a no-exercise (control) group. The cycling group completed three sessions of high cadence cycling, on a custom motorized stationary cycle, consisting of a 5-minute warm-up at 50 revolutions per minute (rpm), 30 minutes of high cadence cycling between 75-85 rpm, and a 5-minute cool down. Depression was assessed using Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) at baseline and 1 week later. BDI-II is a 21-question self-assessment that examines feelings of hopelessness, irritability and fatigue. RESULTS: At baseline, 31% of the individuals showed symptoms of depression. Overall, there were no significant changes in BDI scores after the intervention. However, not all of the subjects recruited had depression according to the BDI. Individuals who showed symptoms of depression (BDI score > 13) improved their depression score by 4.67 points after high-cadence cycling and the control group only improved by 2.75 points. CONCLUSIONS: Although three high-cadence cycling sessions did not result in significant improvements in BDI-II, it is possible that additional sessions of high-cadence cycling will promote further improvements in depression amongst individuals with PD. Future studies should examine the effects of additional cycling sessions on depression in this high-risk population.