Abstract Title

Heavy Rope Exercise on Hemodynamics and Arterial Stiffness in Resistance-trained Individuals

Abstract

PROBLEM: Heavy rope exercise may increase muscle hypertrophy and maximal strength. However, the effects of heavy rope exercise on cardiovascular hemodynamics and arterial stiffness is unknown. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of heavy rope exercise on cardiovascular hemodynamics and arterial stiffness. METHODS: Fifteen resistance-trained individuals volunteered to participate. Cardiovascular hemodynamics and arterial stiffness were collected at rest, 15 (Rec1), 30 (Rec2) and 60 (Rec3) minutes after an acute bout of heavy rope exercise. Cardiovascular hemodynamics included heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), and total peripheral resistance (TPR). Arterial stiffness was measured via carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV). The acute heavy rope exercise consisted of six, 15-second exercise bouts, using a double wave pattern, separated by 30-seconds of passive recovery intervals; the pace of the exercise was set at 180bpm. RESULTS: There were no significant main effects of time on MAP or SV. There were significant (p=0.0001) main effects of time for HR, CO, TPR. HR and CO were elevated at all times post-exercise, and was higher at Rec1 compared to Rec2, and Rec3, and was lower at Rec3 compared to Rec1 and Rec2. TPR was reduced at Rec1, Rec2 and Rec3 compared to rest. There were also significant main effect of time for cf-PWV such that it was attenuated at Rec3 compared to Rec1 and Rec2. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that acute heavy rope exercise increases cardiovascular workload for at least 30 minutes.

Modified Abstract

PROBLEM: Since the effects of heavy rope exercise on cardiovascular modulation is unknown, we evaluated heavy rope exercise on cardiovascular hemodynamics and arterial stiffness. METHODS: Cardiovascular hemodynamics and arterial stiffness were collected at rest, 15, 30, and 60 minutes after heavy rope exercise. Cardiovascular hemodynamics included heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), and total peripheral resistance (TPR). Arterial stiffness was measured via carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV). RESULTS: There were no significant main effects of time for MAP or SV. There were significant main effects of time for HR, CO, TPR. There was a significant main effect of time for cf-PWV. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that acute heavy rope exercise increases cardiovascular workload for at least 30 minutes.

Research Category

Social Science/Education/Public Health

Primary Author's Major

Exercise Science

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. J. Derek

Kingsley

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

April 2019

Therese Smith Biography.docx (12 kB)
Brief Biography

Therese medium.jpg (2021 kB)
Headshot

Research Area

Exercise Physiology | Exercise Science

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

Heavy Rope Exercise on Hemodynamics and Arterial Stiffness in Resistance-trained Individuals

PROBLEM: Heavy rope exercise may increase muscle hypertrophy and maximal strength. However, the effects of heavy rope exercise on cardiovascular hemodynamics and arterial stiffness is unknown. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of heavy rope exercise on cardiovascular hemodynamics and arterial stiffness. METHODS: Fifteen resistance-trained individuals volunteered to participate. Cardiovascular hemodynamics and arterial stiffness were collected at rest, 15 (Rec1), 30 (Rec2) and 60 (Rec3) minutes after an acute bout of heavy rope exercise. Cardiovascular hemodynamics included heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), and total peripheral resistance (TPR). Arterial stiffness was measured via carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV). The acute heavy rope exercise consisted of six, 15-second exercise bouts, using a double wave pattern, separated by 30-seconds of passive recovery intervals; the pace of the exercise was set at 180bpm. RESULTS: There were no significant main effects of time on MAP or SV. There were significant (p=0.0001) main effects of time for HR, CO, TPR. HR and CO were elevated at all times post-exercise, and was higher at Rec1 compared to Rec2, and Rec3, and was lower at Rec3 compared to Rec1 and Rec2. TPR was reduced at Rec1, Rec2 and Rec3 compared to rest. There were also significant main effect of time for cf-PWV such that it was attenuated at Rec3 compared to Rec1 and Rec2. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that acute heavy rope exercise increases cardiovascular workload for at least 30 minutes.