Abstract Title

Strive for balance: Deviation from a balanced time perspective mediates the relationship between lifetime trauma exposure and self-esteem

Abstract

Most individuals will experience a traumatic event within their lifetime, such as the unexpected death of a loved one or unwanted sexual attention. This study assessed direct and mediated relationships between lifetime trauma exposure and self-esteem, with deviation from a balanced time perspective as a potential mediator. Participants were 133 undergraduates (87% Caucasian, 84% female; mean age 23.76, SD = 8.61) who completed online surveys. Lifetime trauma exposure was assessed using the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire (TLEQ; Kubany et al., 2000; e.g., life-threatening illness). Time perspectives were assessed using a modified version of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI; Zimbardo & Boyd, 1999; e.g., “Painful past experiences keep being replayed in my mind.”). Self-esteem was assessed with the revised Self-Liking/Self-Competence Scale (SLSC-R; Tafarodi & Swann, 2001; e.g., “I am highly effective at the things I do.”). A majority of participants (89%) reported experiencing at least one traumatic event (range 0 to 12; mean = 3.62, SD = 2.83). Regression coefficients were utilized to establish mediation according to Baron and Kenny’s (1986) guidelines, and mediation was confirmed with the Sobel test of mediation. Results indicated that deviation from a balanced time perspective partially mediates the relationship between lifetime trauma exposure and lower self-esteem (Sobel’s test statistic = -2.02, p = .043). Overall, more lifetime trauma exposure was related to greater deviation from a balanced time perspective, which likely resulted in lower self-esteem. Encouraging individuals to strive for balance may be one way to help those adjusting to challenging life events.

Modified Abstract

Most individuals experience traumatic events, such as the unexpected death of a loved one. This study assessed direct and mediated relationships between lifetime trauma exposure and self-esteem, with deviation from a balanced time perspective as a potential mediator. Participants were 133 undergraduates (87% Caucasian, 84% female) who completed online surveys. A majority (89%) reported experiencing at least one trauma. Results indicated that deviation from a balanced time perspective partially mediates the relationship between lifetime trauma exposure and lower self-esteem (Sobel’s test statistic = -2.02, p = .043). Overall, more trauma exposure was related to greater deviation from a balanced time perspective, which likely resulted in lower self-esteem. Encouraging individuals to strive for balance may be one way to help those adjusting to challenging life events.

Research Category

Psychology

Primary Author's Major

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Patricia

Tomich

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

April 2019

Research Area

Psychology | Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

Strive for balance: Deviation from a balanced time perspective mediates the relationship between lifetime trauma exposure and self-esteem

Most individuals will experience a traumatic event within their lifetime, such as the unexpected death of a loved one or unwanted sexual attention. This study assessed direct and mediated relationships between lifetime trauma exposure and self-esteem, with deviation from a balanced time perspective as a potential mediator. Participants were 133 undergraduates (87% Caucasian, 84% female; mean age 23.76, SD = 8.61) who completed online surveys. Lifetime trauma exposure was assessed using the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire (TLEQ; Kubany et al., 2000; e.g., life-threatening illness). Time perspectives were assessed using a modified version of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI; Zimbardo & Boyd, 1999; e.g., “Painful past experiences keep being replayed in my mind.”). Self-esteem was assessed with the revised Self-Liking/Self-Competence Scale (SLSC-R; Tafarodi & Swann, 2001; e.g., “I am highly effective at the things I do.”). A majority of participants (89%) reported experiencing at least one traumatic event (range 0 to 12; mean = 3.62, SD = 2.83). Regression coefficients were utilized to establish mediation according to Baron and Kenny’s (1986) guidelines, and mediation was confirmed with the Sobel test of mediation. Results indicated that deviation from a balanced time perspective partially mediates the relationship between lifetime trauma exposure and lower self-esteem (Sobel’s test statistic = -2.02, p = .043). Overall, more lifetime trauma exposure was related to greater deviation from a balanced time perspective, which likely resulted in lower self-esteem. Encouraging individuals to strive for balance may be one way to help those adjusting to challenging life events.