Abstract Title

Facial Approximation of a Known Modern Person and an Unidentified Indigenous Person Using Photographs and Casts with Tissue Depth Markers

Abstract

Facial approximation is a method most commonly employed by forensic artists to produce an individual’s image from a description, a photograph, an x-ray or physical remains. This rendering is then used by law enforcement to aid identification of perpetrators, victims & unknown individuals in criminal cases. Since the objective of this technique is to put a face to an otherwise unidentified person, it also has the potential to be applied to archaeological skeletal specimens. Archaeology is a study, a preservation & ultimately a rediscovery of our own collective history. Applying this method to archaeological remains is useful in visualizing other hominid species in the context of human evolution. Additionally, integrating reconstruction more often to archaeological work might engender greater connection between the work being done in this field and the general public. A visual representation of an individual is likely to remind people that they are connected with these findings on a more intimate level. Thereby, promoting collaboration between citizens and archaeologists, engaging people in the field and increasing education and value for this collective history. This project will have enabled me to learn the fundamentals of facial myology & osteology and the methods utilized in facial approximation to produce two reconstructions upon completion: one 2-dimensional rendition of a known modern persons from a photo and a 3-dimensional approximation of an unidentified indigenous person using a cast skull.

Modified Abstract

Facial approximation is employed by forensic artists to reproduce an individual’s image from a description, a photograph, an x-ray or physical remains. This is used by law enforcement to aid identification of individuals in criminal cases. Since the objective is to put a face to an unidentified person, this can be applied to archaeological skeletal specimens. Archaeology is the study & preservation of collective human history. Applying this method to remains enables visualizing other hominid species in the context of human evolution. Additionally, integrating reconstruction with archaeological work engenders greater connection between the work being done in this field and the general public. Such techniques were utilized to produce two reconstructions: one 2-dimensional, of a known modern persons and a 3-dimensional approximation of an unidentified person.

Research Category

Social Science/Education/Public Health

Primary Author's Major

Archaeology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Linda

Spurlock

Start Date

April 2019

Research Area

Biological and Physical Anthropology | Forensic Science and Technology

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

Facial Approximation of a Known Modern Person and an Unidentified Indigenous Person Using Photographs and Casts with Tissue Depth Markers

Facial approximation is a method most commonly employed by forensic artists to produce an individual’s image from a description, a photograph, an x-ray or physical remains. This rendering is then used by law enforcement to aid identification of perpetrators, victims & unknown individuals in criminal cases. Since the objective of this technique is to put a face to an otherwise unidentified person, it also has the potential to be applied to archaeological skeletal specimens. Archaeology is a study, a preservation & ultimately a rediscovery of our own collective history. Applying this method to archaeological remains is useful in visualizing other hominid species in the context of human evolution. Additionally, integrating reconstruction more often to archaeological work might engender greater connection between the work being done in this field and the general public. A visual representation of an individual is likely to remind people that they are connected with these findings on a more intimate level. Thereby, promoting collaboration between citizens and archaeologists, engaging people in the field and increasing education and value for this collective history. This project will have enabled me to learn the fundamentals of facial myology & osteology and the methods utilized in facial approximation to produce two reconstructions upon completion: one 2-dimensional rendition of a known modern persons from a photo and a 3-dimensional approximation of an unidentified indigenous person using a cast skull.