Abstract

PROBLEM: The effects of high-intensity heavy rope exercise (HI-HRE) on pulse wave reflection are unknown. Therefore, we examined alterations in pulse wave reflection after HI-HRE in resistance-trained individuals (n=15). METHODS: Heart rate (HR), brachial and aortic blood pressure (BP), and pulse wave reflection were collected at rest and 15 (Rec1), 30 (Rec2), and 60 (Rec3) minutes following HI-HRE. During the HI-HRE, participants performed six, 15-second exercise bouts, separated by 30-second seated, passive recovery intervals at a pace of 180bpm. A one-way repeated ANOVA was used to analyze the effects HI-HRE across time (rest, Rec1, Rec2, Rec3). Post hoc analysis utilized paired t-tests with a Bonferonni correction. RESULTS: There were significant (p0.05) main effects of time for brachial or aortic BP. There was a significant main effect of time for central augmentation pressure such that it was augmented from rest to Rec1. There was a significant main effect of time for the Augmentation Index (AIx) such that it was augmented from rest to Rec1. There was a significant main effect of time for the AIx normalized at 75bpm such that it was augmented from rest to Rec1 and Rec2, but was similar to Rec3. CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that recovery from acute high-intensity heavy rope exercise has a significant effect on pulse wave reflection lasting up to 60 minutes post-exercise.

Keywords: interval exercise, augmentation index, blood pressure, heart rate.

Modified Abstract

PROBLEM: The effects of high-intensity heavy rope exercise (HI-HRE) on pulse wave reflection are unknown. METHODS: Heart rate (HR), brachial and aortic blood pressure (BP), and pulse wave reflection were collected at rest and 15, 30, and 60 minutes post-exercise. RESULTS: There were significant main effects of time for HR such that it was augmented at all times post-exercise compared to rest. There were no significant main effects for brachial or aortic BP. There was a significant main effect of time for the augmentation Index (AIx) and the AIx normalized at 75bpm. CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that recovery from high-intensity heavy rope exercise has a significant effect on pulse wave reflection lasting up to 60 minutes post-exercise.

Research Category

Social Science/Education/Public Health

Primary Author's Major

Exercise Science

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. J. Derek

Kingsley

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

April 2019

Research Area

Exercise Physiology | Exercise Science

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

High-intensity Heavy Rope Exercise on Pulse Wave Reflection in Resistance-trained Individuals

PROBLEM: The effects of high-intensity heavy rope exercise (HI-HRE) on pulse wave reflection are unknown. Therefore, we examined alterations in pulse wave reflection after HI-HRE in resistance-trained individuals (n=15). METHODS: Heart rate (HR), brachial and aortic blood pressure (BP), and pulse wave reflection were collected at rest and 15 (Rec1), 30 (Rec2), and 60 (Rec3) minutes following HI-HRE. During the HI-HRE, participants performed six, 15-second exercise bouts, separated by 30-second seated, passive recovery intervals at a pace of 180bpm. A one-way repeated ANOVA was used to analyze the effects HI-HRE across time (rest, Rec1, Rec2, Rec3). Post hoc analysis utilized paired t-tests with a Bonferonni correction. RESULTS: There were significant (p0.05) main effects of time for brachial or aortic BP. There was a significant main effect of time for central augmentation pressure such that it was augmented from rest to Rec1. There was a significant main effect of time for the Augmentation Index (AIx) such that it was augmented from rest to Rec1. There was a significant main effect of time for the AIx normalized at 75bpm such that it was augmented from rest to Rec1 and Rec2, but was similar to Rec3. CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that recovery from acute high-intensity heavy rope exercise has a significant effect on pulse wave reflection lasting up to 60 minutes post-exercise.

Keywords: interval exercise, augmentation index, blood pressure, heart rate.