Abstract

PROBLEM: Only a handful of studies have evaluated differences in autonomic modulation between resistance-trained (RT) and untrained (UT) individuals in response to an acute bout of resistance exercise (ARE). Therefore, we sought to compare alterations in vagal modulation during recovery from ARE in RT (n=18) and UT (n=8) individuals. METHODS:Vagal modulation was assessed using heart rate variability [log transformed high-frequency power (lnHF)], as well as heart rate complexity [Sample Entropy (SampEn) and Lempel-Ziv entropy (LZEn)]. Data were collected at rest, 15 minutes (Rec1) and 30 minutes (Rec2) during recovery from ARE. The acute bout of resistance exercise utilized 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 75% 1-repetition maximum (1RM) and 2 minutes of rest between sets and exercises on the chest press, leg press, lat pulldown, leg curl and leg extension. RESULTS:The groups were similar (p>0.05) for age, and height, but not weight. The total volume lifted during the acute bout of resistance exercise was significantly different between groups. At rest, all measures of vagal modulation were similar between groups with no 3-way interactions. There were significant time x condition interactions for lnHF, SampEn, and LZEn. Each of these variables were reduced at Rec1 and Rec2 compared to rest, with similar responses between the resistance-trained and untrained groups. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that both resistance-trained and untrained individuals respond similarly to an acute bout of resistance exercise using weight machines.

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Modified Abstract

PROBLEM: Autonomic modulation between resistance-trained (RT) and untrained (UT) individuals in response to resistance exercise (RE) are unclear. Therefore, we compared vagal modulation during recovery from RE in RT (n=18) and UT (n=8) individuals. METHODS:Vagal modulation was assessed using heart rate variability [high-frequency power (lnHF)], as well as heart rate complexity [Sample Entropy (SampEn) and Lempel-Ziv entropy (LZEn)]. Data were collected at rest, 15 (Rec1) and 30 minutes (Rec2) post-exercise. RESULTS:At rest, there were no differences in vagal modulation between groups. There were significant two-way interactions for lnHF, SampEn, and LZEn, such that they were reduced at Rec1 and Rec2 compared to rest, with similar responses between groups. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that both groups responded similarly to resistance exercise using weight machines.

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Keywords: heart rate complexity, heart rate variability, strength training, weight machines, autonomic nervous system

Research Category

Social Science/Education/Public Health

Primary Author's Major

Exercise Science

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. J. Derek

Kingsley

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

April 2019

BioHeadshot.docx (374 kB)

Research Area

Exercise Physiology | Exercise Science

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

Reductions in Vagal Tone After Acute Resistance Exercise Are Similar Between Resistance-Trained and Untrained Individuals

PROBLEM: Only a handful of studies have evaluated differences in autonomic modulation between resistance-trained (RT) and untrained (UT) individuals in response to an acute bout of resistance exercise (ARE). Therefore, we sought to compare alterations in vagal modulation during recovery from ARE in RT (n=18) and UT (n=8) individuals. METHODS:Vagal modulation was assessed using heart rate variability [log transformed high-frequency power (lnHF)], as well as heart rate complexity [Sample Entropy (SampEn) and Lempel-Ziv entropy (LZEn)]. Data were collected at rest, 15 minutes (Rec1) and 30 minutes (Rec2) during recovery from ARE. The acute bout of resistance exercise utilized 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 75% 1-repetition maximum (1RM) and 2 minutes of rest between sets and exercises on the chest press, leg press, lat pulldown, leg curl and leg extension. RESULTS:The groups were similar (p>0.05) for age, and height, but not weight. The total volume lifted during the acute bout of resistance exercise was significantly different between groups. At rest, all measures of vagal modulation were similar between groups with no 3-way interactions. There were significant time x condition interactions for lnHF, SampEn, and LZEn. Each of these variables were reduced at Rec1 and Rec2 compared to rest, with similar responses between the resistance-trained and untrained groups. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that both resistance-trained and untrained individuals respond similarly to an acute bout of resistance exercise using weight machines.

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