Abstract Title

Effect of Ketogenic Diet on Liver

Abstract

Low carbohydrate ketogenic diets are mainly used for treatment of pediatric epilepsy, but more recently for obesity, and even neurological disease. In neurological diseases such as glaucoma, the ketogenic diet has been shown to mitigate inflammation and axon degeneration, while maintaining axon signaling function. However, long term maintenance of the ketogenic diet may have adverse side effects on the liver. In this study, we investigated whether the ketogenic diet used to treat for glaucoma in mice can have peripheral effects that may be detrimental. Mice genetically predisposed to secondary glaucoma were placed on a ketogenic diet to promote mitochondrial function while limiting glycolysis. The diet was 89 percent fat, 10 percent protein, and 1 percent carbohydrate. The diet was effective in ameliorating glaucoma development and maintaining retinal function. After eight weeks of the diet, the liver tissue was collected then stained with Oil Red-O or Hematoxylin and Eosin to highlight any accumulated fat (Oil Red-O) or the histopathological condition of the hepatocytes (H&E). High accumulated fat or disrupted hepatocytes would indicate that the ketogenic diet negatively impacts liver health in these animals. Preliminary analysis indicates the hepatocytes were relatively normal and fat accumulation was minimal to none. More exhaustive analysis is ongoing, though it appears that 8 weeks of the diet was well-managed by the liver in these mice.

Modified Abstract

In neurological diseases such as glaucoma, the ketogenic diet has been shown to mitigate inflammation and axon degeneration. However, long term maintenance of the ketogenic diet may have adverse side effects on the liver. We investigated whether the ketogenic diet used to treat for glaucoma in mice can have peripheral effects. Mice genetically predisposed to secondary glaucoma were placed on a ketogenic diet to promote mitochondrial function while limiting glycolysis. The liver tissue was collected then stained with Oil Red-O or Hematoxylin and Eosin. High accumulated fat or disrupted hepatocytes would indicate that the ketogenic diet negatively impacts liver health in these animals. More exhaustive analysis is ongoing, though it appears that 8 weeks of the diet was well-managed by the liver in these mice.

Research Category

Biomedical Sciences

Author Information

Raman BhambraFollow

Primary Author's Major

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Osteopathy

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Denise

Inman

Mentor #2 Information

Amelia

McMullen

Mentor #3 Information

Tyree

Lewis

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

April 2019

Research Area

Eye Diseases | Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

Effect of Ketogenic Diet on Liver

Low carbohydrate ketogenic diets are mainly used for treatment of pediatric epilepsy, but more recently for obesity, and even neurological disease. In neurological diseases such as glaucoma, the ketogenic diet has been shown to mitigate inflammation and axon degeneration, while maintaining axon signaling function. However, long term maintenance of the ketogenic diet may have adverse side effects on the liver. In this study, we investigated whether the ketogenic diet used to treat for glaucoma in mice can have peripheral effects that may be detrimental. Mice genetically predisposed to secondary glaucoma were placed on a ketogenic diet to promote mitochondrial function while limiting glycolysis. The diet was 89 percent fat, 10 percent protein, and 1 percent carbohydrate. The diet was effective in ameliorating glaucoma development and maintaining retinal function. After eight weeks of the diet, the liver tissue was collected then stained with Oil Red-O or Hematoxylin and Eosin to highlight any accumulated fat (Oil Red-O) or the histopathological condition of the hepatocytes (H&E). High accumulated fat or disrupted hepatocytes would indicate that the ketogenic diet negatively impacts liver health in these animals. Preliminary analysis indicates the hepatocytes were relatively normal and fat accumulation was minimal to none. More exhaustive analysis is ongoing, though it appears that 8 weeks of the diet was well-managed by the liver in these mice.