Abstract

Introduction: Emotional eating (EE) in children has been linked to childhood obesity and may be predictive of parental over-involvement. Parental over-involvement relates to lower sleep quality in children, and short sleep duration also influences overeating. The current study will examine if sleep quality moderates an association between parental over-involvement and child EE.

Methods: Parents (N=71; M age =43.4±.6.14 years) and children (N=71, M age =11.7±2.65) were recruited as part of a larger study examining neurocognitive functioning in children with and without anxiety. Child EE was measured using the Emotional Eating Scale for Children (EES-C). Parenting style was measured using the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire (APQ). Parent-reported child sleep quality was measured using the Sleep Disturbances Scale for Children (SDSC).

Results: A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was conducted. The APQ and SDSC scores were entered in step 1, and interaction term (APQ x SDSC) was entered in step 2. Both the initial model, F(2, 68) = .1.473, p = .236 and overall model with the interaction term were non-significant, F(3, 67) = .023, p = .410.

Discussion: A non-significant relationship was found between parental involvement, sleep, and EE. It is possible that other parenting practices (e.g., over-control) are more impactful on EE. Parents and children also may have been inaccurate in their estimate of sleep, over-involvement, and EE. This study demonstrates that the relationship between child EE and parenting is complex and should be studied from different directions. Future research should longitudinally examine different aspects of parenting on child EE.

Modified Abstract

Past research has shown that emotional eating (EE) may be predictive of parental over-involvement. Sleep has been researched along these two factors as well. This study examines if sleep quality moderates an association between parental involvement and child EE. Parents and children were recruited as part of a larger study examining neurocognitive functioning in children with and without anxiety. Both parents and children were given several self-report questionnaires, and a hierarchical multiple regression analysis was conducted. The initial model, F(2, 68) = .1.473, p = .236 and overall model with the interaction term were non-significant, F(3, 67) = .023, p = .410. An explanation could be that other parenting practices (e.g., over-control) are more impactful on EE. Parents and children also may have been inaccurate in their estimate of sleep, involvement, and EE. The relationship between child EE and parenting is complex and should be studied from multiple directions.

Research Category

Psychology

Author Information

Jenna RuedlingerFollow

Primary Author's Major

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Chris

Flessner

Mentor #2 Information

Anna

Luke

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

April 2019

Research Area

Child Psychology

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

Childhood Sleep Quality as a Moderating Variable Between Parental Influence and Child Emotional Eating

Introduction: Emotional eating (EE) in children has been linked to childhood obesity and may be predictive of parental over-involvement. Parental over-involvement relates to lower sleep quality in children, and short sleep duration also influences overeating. The current study will examine if sleep quality moderates an association between parental over-involvement and child EE.

Methods: Parents (N=71; M age =43.4±.6.14 years) and children (N=71, M age =11.7±2.65) were recruited as part of a larger study examining neurocognitive functioning in children with and without anxiety. Child EE was measured using the Emotional Eating Scale for Children (EES-C). Parenting style was measured using the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire (APQ). Parent-reported child sleep quality was measured using the Sleep Disturbances Scale for Children (SDSC).

Results: A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was conducted. The APQ and SDSC scores were entered in step 1, and interaction term (APQ x SDSC) was entered in step 2. Both the initial model, F(2, 68) = .1.473, p = .236 and overall model with the interaction term were non-significant, F(3, 67) = .023, p = .410.

Discussion: A non-significant relationship was found between parental involvement, sleep, and EE. It is possible that other parenting practices (e.g., over-control) are more impactful on EE. Parents and children also may have been inaccurate in their estimate of sleep, over-involvement, and EE. This study demonstrates that the relationship between child EE and parenting is complex and should be studied from different directions. Future research should longitudinally examine different aspects of parenting on child EE.