Abstract Title

The Connection Between German Extenzminimum and Spanish Vivienda Minima

Abstract

Extenzminimum, defined as the minimum habitable dwelling, is a concept developed in Germany following World War I. In principle, it is a means of generating housing solutions that used an economy of space and materials and could respond to the housing crisis facing Europe. Such a housing crisis arose as vivienda minima in Spain during and after the Spanish Civil War. This topic investigates how the idea of extenzminimum is shared with Spain and how that idea influenced the concept of vivienda minima even when geographical and political barriers existed between the two nations.

This project will study architectural works and concepts in Germany and Spain during the 1920’s, 30’s, and 40’s. Specifically, the works of Ernst May (Neue Frankfurt), Alexander Klein (Residential Building and Apartments for Single Workers), Walter Gropius (Hansaviertel, Grosssiedlung, and Siemensstadt), Miguel Fisac (Chain houses), and GATEPAC. These works are important because each architect was influenced by or wrote about minimal habitable dwellings. The resultant architecture will demonstrate how those ideas were interpreted and if the German response to minimal habitable dwellings is related to the Spanish response.

This paper will consult primary and secondary sources such as writings of May, Klein, and Gropius in Germany during the extenziminimum movement. In addition, the writings of Fisac and GATEPAC will further the understanding of Spain’s interpretation of vivienda minima and determine if those ideas are related to Germany.

Modified Abstract

Extenzminimum, defined as the minimum habitable dwelling, is a means of generating housing solutions that used an economy of space and materials and could respond to the housing crisis facing Europe. Such a housing crisis arose as vivienda minima in Spain during and after the Spanish Civil War. This topic investigates how the idea of extenzminimum influenced vivienda minima even when geographical and political barriers existed between the two nations.

This project will study architectural works and concepts in Germany and Spain during the 1920’s, 30’s, and 40’s. Specifically, the works of Ernst May, Alexander Klein, Walter Gropius, Miguel Fisac, and GATEPAC. The work of these architects demonstrates how those ideas were interpreted and if the German and Spanish response to minimal habitable dwellings are related.

Research Category

Architecture

Author Information

Chad BostonFollow

Primary Author's Major

Architecture

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Tippey

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

5-4-2018 1:00 PM

Research Area

Architectural History and Criticism | Architecture

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Apr 5th, 1:00 PM

The Connection Between German Extenzminimum and Spanish Vivienda Minima

Extenzminimum, defined as the minimum habitable dwelling, is a concept developed in Germany following World War I. In principle, it is a means of generating housing solutions that used an economy of space and materials and could respond to the housing crisis facing Europe. Such a housing crisis arose as vivienda minima in Spain during and after the Spanish Civil War. This topic investigates how the idea of extenzminimum is shared with Spain and how that idea influenced the concept of vivienda minima even when geographical and political barriers existed between the two nations.

This project will study architectural works and concepts in Germany and Spain during the 1920’s, 30’s, and 40’s. Specifically, the works of Ernst May (Neue Frankfurt), Alexander Klein (Residential Building and Apartments for Single Workers), Walter Gropius (Hansaviertel, Grosssiedlung, and Siemensstadt), Miguel Fisac (Chain houses), and GATEPAC. These works are important because each architect was influenced by or wrote about minimal habitable dwellings. The resultant architecture will demonstrate how those ideas were interpreted and if the German response to minimal habitable dwellings is related to the Spanish response.

This paper will consult primary and secondary sources such as writings of May, Klein, and Gropius in Germany during the extenziminimum movement. In addition, the writings of Fisac and GATEPAC will further the understanding of Spain’s interpretation of vivienda minima and determine if those ideas are related to Germany.