Abstract Title

Defining Sexual Consent: Identifying Non-consent

Abstract

An important component in sexual victimization is identifying the communication of consent from a partner. We examined whether college students could correctly identify non-consent and influences of gender, means of communication (verbal and non-verbal), and level of sexual activity.A survey was completed by 684 undergraduate students (301 men) randomly assigned to groups (verbal or non-verbal communication) and rated three examples of not giving consent that differed based on increasing levels of sexual activity. Consent was rated on a scale from one to five, where 5 indicates that consent was “definitely not given.” Scores of 4 or 5 were considered correct. For verbal consent, gender interacted with level, F(2,664) = 4.5, p = .012. Examination of means suggested that women rated the examples slightly more non-consensual than men as the level of sexual activity increased. For nonverbal consent revealed a gender effect, F(1,332) = 7.4, p =.013. Women rated the nonverbal examples as more indicative of non-consent (M = 4.73, SD = .66) than men (M = 4.49, SD = .95). Although people generally correctly identified the examples as not giving consent, women gave higher ratings of non-consent for verbal communication, as well as for non-verbal communication as the level of sexual activity increased.

Modified Abstract

An important component in sexual victimization is identifying communication of consent from a partner. We examined whether college students could correctly identify non-consent and influences of gender, means of communication (verbal and non-verbal), and level of sexual activity. A survey was completed by 684 undergraduate students (301 men) randomly assigned to groups (verbal or non-verbal communication) and rated three examples of non-consent that differed based on increasing levels of sexual activity. Examination of means suggested that women rated the examples slightly more non-consensual than men as the level of sexual activity increased. Although people generally correctly identified the examples as non-consensual, results demonstrated women gave higher ratings of non-consent for verbal communication, as well as for non-verbal communication as the level of sexual activity increased.

Research Category

Psychology

Primary Author's Major

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. RaeAnn Anderson

Mentor #2 Information

Dr. Joel Hughes

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

5-4-2018 1:00 PM

Research Area

Psychology

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Apr 5th, 1:00 PM

Defining Sexual Consent: Identifying Non-consent

An important component in sexual victimization is identifying the communication of consent from a partner. We examined whether college students could correctly identify non-consent and influences of gender, means of communication (verbal and non-verbal), and level of sexual activity.A survey was completed by 684 undergraduate students (301 men) randomly assigned to groups (verbal or non-verbal communication) and rated three examples of not giving consent that differed based on increasing levels of sexual activity. Consent was rated on a scale from one to five, where 5 indicates that consent was “definitely not given.” Scores of 4 or 5 were considered correct. For verbal consent, gender interacted with level, F(2,664) = 4.5, p = .012. Examination of means suggested that women rated the examples slightly more non-consensual than men as the level of sexual activity increased. For nonverbal consent revealed a gender effect, F(1,332) = 7.4, p =.013. Women rated the nonverbal examples as more indicative of non-consent (M = 4.73, SD = .66) than men (M = 4.49, SD = .95). Although people generally correctly identified the examples as not giving consent, women gave higher ratings of non-consent for verbal communication, as well as for non-verbal communication as the level of sexual activity increased.