Abstract Title

Understanding the risk factors of non-suicidal self-injury in adolescents and young adults

Abstract

Hypothesis What are the personal, genetic, environmental, and other social factors that influence an individual’s engagement in NSSI?

Scholarly Methods: We conducted a literature search of articles from 2007 to 2017 from Pubmed, Medline, Psychinfo, Health Source, and CINHAL. Using the search terms “young adult” and “non-suicidal self-injury,” we found 209 articles. We excluded articles that included participants over the age of 35, studies taking place outside of the U.S., and those that did not fit our topic resulting in 43 articles. Using coding sheets, aspects such as ‘problem statements, hypotheses, independent and dependent variables, measures and statistical results’ were analyzed.

Findings Three categories of factors leading to NSSI emerged; personal, genetic, environmental, and other social factors. Factors included psychiatric disorders and genetic predictors of NSSI behavior; and increased risk of NSSI related to impulsive personality of an individual. Environmental risk factors included history of abuse, peer victimization, and exposure to NSSI. Social risk factors included poverty, lack of social support, and strained parent/child relationships.

Conclusion This review indicated a need for health care providers to have knowledge of the risk factors of NSSI when assessing any patient in the clinical setting to allow for refer of NSSI patients to appropriate treatment. Additionally, the review demonstrated that continued nursing research should be conducted to determine current changes in factors of non-suicidal self-injury. Additional further research should be conducted to understand the triggers contributing to NSSI behavior.

Modified Abstract

Hypothesis What are the personal, genetic, environmental, and other social factors that influence an individual’s engagement in NSSI?

Scholarly Methods: We conducted a literature search of articles from 2007 to 2017 we analyzed the ‘problem statements, hypotheses, independent and dependent variables, measures and statistical results’.

Findings Three categories of factors; personal, genetic, environmental, and other social factors were found.

Conclusion There is a need for health care providers to have knowledge of the risk factors of NSSI. Additional research should be conducted to understand the factors and triggers contributing to NSSI behavior.

Research Category

Nursing

Primary Author's Major

Nursing

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Kimberly A. Williams

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

5-4-2018 1:00 PM

Research Area

Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing | Public Health and Community Nursing

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Apr 5th, 1:00 PM

Understanding the risk factors of non-suicidal self-injury in adolescents and young adults

Hypothesis What are the personal, genetic, environmental, and other social factors that influence an individual’s engagement in NSSI?

Scholarly Methods: We conducted a literature search of articles from 2007 to 2017 from Pubmed, Medline, Psychinfo, Health Source, and CINHAL. Using the search terms “young adult” and “non-suicidal self-injury,” we found 209 articles. We excluded articles that included participants over the age of 35, studies taking place outside of the U.S., and those that did not fit our topic resulting in 43 articles. Using coding sheets, aspects such as ‘problem statements, hypotheses, independent and dependent variables, measures and statistical results’ were analyzed.

Findings Three categories of factors leading to NSSI emerged; personal, genetic, environmental, and other social factors. Factors included psychiatric disorders and genetic predictors of NSSI behavior; and increased risk of NSSI related to impulsive personality of an individual. Environmental risk factors included history of abuse, peer victimization, and exposure to NSSI. Social risk factors included poverty, lack of social support, and strained parent/child relationships.

Conclusion This review indicated a need for health care providers to have knowledge of the risk factors of NSSI when assessing any patient in the clinical setting to allow for refer of NSSI patients to appropriate treatment. Additionally, the review demonstrated that continued nursing research should be conducted to determine current changes in factors of non-suicidal self-injury. Additional further research should be conducted to understand the triggers contributing to NSSI behavior.