Abstract Title

Using Funds of Knowledge to Prepare Haitian Students for a Progressive Future

Abstract

When creating lesson plans for students in K-12 classrooms, a key focus among teachers is to help students create connections between content learned in the classroom and experiences students have had in their lifetimes. Education in the most prevailing countries in the world is continually adapting in order to utilize the most current research findings and technological advancements. As revolution continues in these classrooms, many developing countries have fallen behind. Specifically, in Haiti, many environmental concerns have been identified, and no one is more aware of these issues than its citizens. The major challenge is that schools are limited in their ability to prepare teachers, while resources to utilize modern pedagogies in an effective way are not feasible.

In a recent study in Ouanaminthe, Haiti, findings showed that although students, teachers, and administrators were very aware of the struggles of their country, they felt that there were limited options for resolutions. Additionally, many of these innovations involved finances which are not available. Interviews were conducted with Haitians of various backgrounds and beliefs. A consistent concern among participants was the lack of opportunity for satisfactory cultivation in problem solving, leadership, and career preparation.

Education was determined to be the root at which the most fundamental problems can be addressed. Youth development opportunities are being designed to prepare students to push Haiti towards development. In order to accomplish this, students must be engaged in the classroom, so teachers must be trained to ensure that project-based learning and inquiry practices are being implemented.

Modified Abstract

When creating lesson plans for students in K-12 classrooms, a key focus among teachers is to help students create connections between content learned in the classroom and experiences students have had in their lifetimes. As most countries in the world constantly adapt in response to improved technology and research, schools in Haiti have fallen behind due to a lack of resources. Many environmental concerns have been identified, but the major challenge is the ability to prepare teachers with necessary resources. A recent study conducting interviews and field notes found that Haitian schools strive for innovation, but are unable to find essential funding. In order for youth development opportunities to become available, teachers must become trained in project-based learning, inquiry practices and funds of knowledge pedagogy.

Research Category

Social Science/Education/Public Health

Author Information

Adam SalbergFollow

Primary Author's Major

Life Science

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Lisa Borgerding

Presentation Format

Oral

Start Date

5-4-2018 1:00 PM

Research Area

Curriculum and Instruction | Educational Methods | Educational Sociology | Education Economics | Education Policy | International and Comparative Education

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Apr 5th, 1:00 PM

Using Funds of Knowledge to Prepare Haitian Students for a Progressive Future

When creating lesson plans for students in K-12 classrooms, a key focus among teachers is to help students create connections between content learned in the classroom and experiences students have had in their lifetimes. Education in the most prevailing countries in the world is continually adapting in order to utilize the most current research findings and technological advancements. As revolution continues in these classrooms, many developing countries have fallen behind. Specifically, in Haiti, many environmental concerns have been identified, and no one is more aware of these issues than its citizens. The major challenge is that schools are limited in their ability to prepare teachers, while resources to utilize modern pedagogies in an effective way are not feasible.

In a recent study in Ouanaminthe, Haiti, findings showed that although students, teachers, and administrators were very aware of the struggles of their country, they felt that there were limited options for resolutions. Additionally, many of these innovations involved finances which are not available. Interviews were conducted with Haitians of various backgrounds and beliefs. A consistent concern among participants was the lack of opportunity for satisfactory cultivation in problem solving, leadership, and career preparation.

Education was determined to be the root at which the most fundamental problems can be addressed. Youth development opportunities are being designed to prepare students to push Haiti towards development. In order to accomplish this, students must be engaged in the classroom, so teachers must be trained to ensure that project-based learning and inquiry practices are being implemented.