Abstract

In the twenty-first century, Japan has become a highly mobilized, developed, and social country. This research brings attention to the social withdrawals in Japanese society. These social groups have chosen to live their alternative lifestyles for various reasons. Hikikomori are typically teenagers or young adults who are reclusive and isolate themselves, usually not leaving their homes for six months or longer. NEET is slang, based on the acronym that describes them, as a person who is not in education, employment or training. A parasite single is somebody that chooses to remain living with their parents as single adults, to maintain a more laidback lifestyle. Freeters are either unemployed or work part-time jobs, mostly to avoid being a stereotypical salaryman. The core of this study investigates and hypothesizes the factors and social influences that cause people to exhibit these behaviors, as well as their serious impact on the Japanese workforce, economy, and declining birth rate. Research methods involved using databases to find professional research and publications related to the aforementioned social groups. The tremendous burdens placed upon younger people in Japan appear to be the driving force behind social withdrawal. Examples of this include the highly competitive college entrance exams, and the expectation that all younger people will soon become productive members of society. More details will be sited in regards to the statistics based on gender, class, and psychology of the social groups, as well as steps taken by the government and others to combat these conditions.

Modified Abstract

In the twenty-first century, Japan has become a highly mobilized, developed, and social country. This research focuses on and brings attention to those who have been left behind, and reclusive from society at large. These social groups, being Hikikomori, NEET, Parasite Singles, and Fretter, for various reasons have chosen to live their alternative lifestyles. The core of this study is to investigate and hypothesize the factors and social influences that cause people to exhibit these behaviors and habits. After assessing information available on these topics through databases, publications and professional research, it is evident that there are many factors at play. To be brief, the heavy social expectations put upon Japanese adolescents while they are younger and transitioning into adulthood have the most influence.

Research Category

Geology/Geography

Author Information

Brian KopycinskiFollow

Primary Author's Major

Geography

Mentor #1 Information

Miss Haruka Ogawa

Presentation Format

Oral

Start Date

5-4-2018 1:00 PM

Research Area

Human Geography | Japanese Studies

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Apr 5th, 1:00 PM

Modern-Day Hermits: The Significant Impacts of Hikikomori and Other Social Groups in Japanese Society

In the twenty-first century, Japan has become a highly mobilized, developed, and social country. This research brings attention to the social withdrawals in Japanese society. These social groups have chosen to live their alternative lifestyles for various reasons. Hikikomori are typically teenagers or young adults who are reclusive and isolate themselves, usually not leaving their homes for six months or longer. NEET is slang, based on the acronym that describes them, as a person who is not in education, employment or training. A parasite single is somebody that chooses to remain living with their parents as single adults, to maintain a more laidback lifestyle. Freeters are either unemployed or work part-time jobs, mostly to avoid being a stereotypical salaryman. The core of this study investigates and hypothesizes the factors and social influences that cause people to exhibit these behaviors, as well as their serious impact on the Japanese workforce, economy, and declining birth rate. Research methods involved using databases to find professional research and publications related to the aforementioned social groups. The tremendous burdens placed upon younger people in Japan appear to be the driving force behind social withdrawal. Examples of this include the highly competitive college entrance exams, and the expectation that all younger people will soon become productive members of society. More details will be sited in regards to the statistics based on gender, class, and psychology of the social groups, as well as steps taken by the government and others to combat these conditions.