Abstract Title

Phase Separation in Necrotic Cells

Abstract

Necrotic cells are known to develop characteristic membrane blebs. We measured the protein concentration within necrotic blebs and found that it can be reduced by as much as twenty-fold compared to the main cell body (CB). These results raise two questions: 1. Why do proteins vacate the bleb? and 2. How can osmotic equilibrium be maintained between the bleb and CB? Our photobleaching and ultracentrifugation experiments indicate extensive protein aggregation. We hypothesize that protein aggregation within the CB shifts the chemical equilibrium and draws proteins out of the bleb; at the same time, aggregation reduces the effective molar concentration of protein in the CB, so that osmotic equilibrium between high-protein CB and low-protein necrotic blebs becomes possible.

Modified Abstract

Necrotic cells are known to develop characteristic membrane blebs. We measured the protein concentration within necrotic blebs and found that it can be reduced by as much as twenty-fold compared to the main cell body (CB). These results raise two questions: 1. Why do proteins vacate the bleb? and 2. How can osmotic equilibrium be maintained between the bleb and CB? Our photobleaching and ultracentrifugation experiments indicate extensive protein aggregation. We hypothesize that protein aggregation within the CB shifts the chemical equilibrium and draws proteins out of the bleb; at the same time, aggregation reduces the effective molar concentration of protein in the CB, so that osmotic equilibrium between high-protein CB and low-protein necrotic blebs becomes possible.

Research Category

Biology/Ecology

Primary Author's Major

Biology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Michael A. Model

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

5-4-2018 1:00 PM

Research Area

Cell Biology | Cellular and Molecular Physiology

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Apr 5th, 1:00 PM

Phase Separation in Necrotic Cells

Necrotic cells are known to develop characteristic membrane blebs. We measured the protein concentration within necrotic blebs and found that it can be reduced by as much as twenty-fold compared to the main cell body (CB). These results raise two questions: 1. Why do proteins vacate the bleb? and 2. How can osmotic equilibrium be maintained between the bleb and CB? Our photobleaching and ultracentrifugation experiments indicate extensive protein aggregation. We hypothesize that protein aggregation within the CB shifts the chemical equilibrium and draws proteins out of the bleb; at the same time, aggregation reduces the effective molar concentration of protein in the CB, so that osmotic equilibrium between high-protein CB and low-protein necrotic blebs becomes possible.