Abstract Title

Cellular Telephone Use Predicts the Likelihood of Being Categorized as an “Active Couch Potato”

Abstract

PROBLEM: Cellular telephone (cell phone) use is positively associated with sedentary behavior, but not related to physical activity. Therefore, it is possible that individuals who use their cell phone heavily may participate in large amounts of sedentary behavior while also regularly participating in physical activity. Therefore, cell phone use may predict the likelihood of being an “active couch potato.”

Method: A sample of 228 college students completed validated survey items to assess their cell phone use, physical activity, and sedentary behavior. Tertile splits were performed and participants were categorized into low, moderate or high groups for each of these three variables. Participants were then categorized as “active couch potatoes” if they were a) in the high physical activity group and also in a high or moderate sitting group, or b) in the moderate physical activity group and also in the high sitting group. A binary logistic regression was then used to test if cell phone use group predicted being an “active couch potato.”

Results: According to the binary logistic regression the likelihood of being an “active couch potato” was significantly (χ2 = 11.0, p = 0.01) associated with cell phone use. Specifically, individuals in the moderate and high cell phone use groups were 2.3 and 3.5 times more likely (Wald ≥ 3.9, p < 0.05), respectively, to be an active couch potato than low users.

Conclusion: Moderate and high cell phone users were significantly more likely to be categorized as “active couch potatoes” than their low use peers.

Modified Abstract

PROBLEM: Cellular phone use is positively associated with sedentary behavior (sitting), but not physical activity. Individuals who use their cell phone heavily may simultaneously participate in large amounts of sitting and regular physical activity making them “active couch potatoes.”

Method: Tertile splits were used to group 228 college participants based upon physical activity, sitting and cell phone use. Participants who were both highly physically active and sedentary, based upon these tertile splits, were defined as “active couch potatoes.”

Results: According to the binary logistic regression the likelihood of being an “active couch potato” was positively associated with cell phone use.

Conclusion: Moderate and high cell phone users were 2.3 to 3.5 times more likely to be categorized as “active couch potatoes” than low users.

Research Category

Biomedical Sciences

Primary Author's Major

Exercise Science

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Jacob Edward Barkley

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

5-4-2018 1:00 PM

Research Area

Medicine and Health Sciences | Rehabilitation and Therapy | Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Apr 5th, 1:00 PM

Cellular Telephone Use Predicts the Likelihood of Being Categorized as an “Active Couch Potato”

PROBLEM: Cellular telephone (cell phone) use is positively associated with sedentary behavior, but not related to physical activity. Therefore, it is possible that individuals who use their cell phone heavily may participate in large amounts of sedentary behavior while also regularly participating in physical activity. Therefore, cell phone use may predict the likelihood of being an “active couch potato.”

Method: A sample of 228 college students completed validated survey items to assess their cell phone use, physical activity, and sedentary behavior. Tertile splits were performed and participants were categorized into low, moderate or high groups for each of these three variables. Participants were then categorized as “active couch potatoes” if they were a) in the high physical activity group and also in a high or moderate sitting group, or b) in the moderate physical activity group and also in the high sitting group. A binary logistic regression was then used to test if cell phone use group predicted being an “active couch potato.”

Results: According to the binary logistic regression the likelihood of being an “active couch potato” was significantly (χ2 = 11.0, p = 0.01) associated with cell phone use. Specifically, individuals in the moderate and high cell phone use groups were 2.3 and 3.5 times more likely (Wald ≥ 3.9, p < 0.05), respectively, to be an active couch potato than low users.

Conclusion: Moderate and high cell phone users were significantly more likely to be categorized as “active couch potatoes” than their low use peers.