Abstract Title

Perceptions of Homeschooling

Abstract

Homeschooling has become an increasingly popular form of educating children over the years, with many studies showing homeschooling to be beneficial for the academic and personal well-being of students. In spite of the potential benefits of homeschooling, research suggests that this educational minority may be stigmatized and stereotyped. This stigmatization and stereotyping, if internalized, can negatively affect how these individuals view themselves, which is subsequently associated with lower self-esteem. Researchers have compared the self-esteem of homeschoolers relative to their non-homeschooled peers, yet little research exists examining how stereotypes affect homeschoolers, including the extent to which they internalize stereotypes and whether their self-esteem is affected by these stereotypes. Using an online survey of 540 respondents, this study seeks to address this gap in literature by examining public and self-perceptions of homeschoolers, as well as the association between self-perceptions and self-esteem. It is hypothesized that those homeschoolers who have internalized negative perceptions will possess lower self-esteem relative to those who have not internalized negative perceptions. Preliminary findings suggest that public perceptions of homeschooling are consistent with common stereotypes, and that internalizing these (positive and negative) stereotypes is associated with self-esteem for individuals who have been homeschooled.

Modified Abstract

Homeschooling has been shown to be beneficial for the academic and personal well-being of students. In spite of these potential benefits, research suggests that this educational minority may experience negative stereotypes. If these stereotypes are internalized, it can negatively affect how homeschoolers view themselves, which is associated with lower self-esteem. Using an online survey of 540 respondents, this study seeks to examine public and self-perceptions of homeschoolers, as well as the association between self-perceptions and self-esteem. It is hypothesized that those homeschoolers who have internalized negative perceptions will possess lower self-esteem relative to those who have not internalized negative perceptions. Preliminary findings suggest that public perceptions of homeschooling are consistent with common stereotypes, and that internalizing these stereotypes is associated with self-esteem for homeschooled individuals.

Research Category

Social Science/Education/Public Health

Author Information

Christina WatsonFollow

Primary Author's Major

Sociology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Kristen Marcussen

Presentation Format

Oral

Start Date

5-4-2018 1:00 PM

Research Area

Social and Behavioral Sciences | Sociology

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Apr 5th, 1:00 PM

Perceptions of Homeschooling

Homeschooling has become an increasingly popular form of educating children over the years, with many studies showing homeschooling to be beneficial for the academic and personal well-being of students. In spite of the potential benefits of homeschooling, research suggests that this educational minority may be stigmatized and stereotyped. This stigmatization and stereotyping, if internalized, can negatively affect how these individuals view themselves, which is subsequently associated with lower self-esteem. Researchers have compared the self-esteem of homeschoolers relative to their non-homeschooled peers, yet little research exists examining how stereotypes affect homeschoolers, including the extent to which they internalize stereotypes and whether their self-esteem is affected by these stereotypes. Using an online survey of 540 respondents, this study seeks to address this gap in literature by examining public and self-perceptions of homeschoolers, as well as the association between self-perceptions and self-esteem. It is hypothesized that those homeschoolers who have internalized negative perceptions will possess lower self-esteem relative to those who have not internalized negative perceptions. Preliminary findings suggest that public perceptions of homeschooling are consistent with common stereotypes, and that internalizing these (positive and negative) stereotypes is associated with self-esteem for individuals who have been homeschooled.