Abstract Title

Nurses on Boards in the State of Ohio

Abstract

A 2010 report by the Institute of Medicine identified nursing as a key element in healthcare reform efforts. As a result, state and national coalitions formed to increase the number of nurses serving on boards. Despite these efforts, nurses remain underrepresented on all types of boards, including decision-making boards at a local and state level. This descriptive study involved the analysis of 53 state-level boards in Ohio. Using a master list of boards compiled by the Ohio Nurses on Boards Coalition, Information about each board was collected from agency websites and analyzed to determine board purpose and composition, including the presence of nurses on the board. Data was gathered and synthesized into a matrix for comparison.

Findings: Three (5.6%) boards had nurses on them. Further, out of 509 total state board members, only 13 (2.5%) were nurses. Boards with nurse board members serving include the Ohio Commission on Minority Health, Ohio Board of Nursing, and the State Board of Emergency Medical, Fire, and Transportation Services. Though nurses serve on these health-related boards, all other health-related boards were lacking nursing representation. Nurses provide an essential role in other boards at a state level due to their compassion, regard for the community, leadership abilities, and decision-making skills. Nurses must advocate for themselves and actively pursue roles in both local and state boards as they make valuable additions to many types of decision-making boards.

Modified Abstract

Despite efforts of state and national coalitions to encourage nurses to be active on boards, nurses remain underrepresented on decision-making boards at local and state levels. Membership of state-level boards, based on a list created by the Ohio Nurses on Boards Coalition, were analyzed and synthesized into a matrix. Out of 53 state boards, nurses had presence on three (5.6%) of them, and out of 509 total board members, only 13 (2.5%) were nurses. Nurses are leaders in healthcare. Their leadership skills, healthcare system knowledge, compassion, decision-making, and problem solving abilities make it imperative that nurses are involved on decision-making boards that impact the health of citizens in Ohio. To accomplish this goal, nurses must pursue board positions and advocate for themselves.

Research Category

Nursing

Primary Author's Major

Nursing

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Yvonne Smith

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

5-4-2018 1:00 PM

Research Area

Nursing Administration | Other Nursing

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Apr 5th, 1:00 PM

Nurses on Boards in the State of Ohio

A 2010 report by the Institute of Medicine identified nursing as a key element in healthcare reform efforts. As a result, state and national coalitions formed to increase the number of nurses serving on boards. Despite these efforts, nurses remain underrepresented on all types of boards, including decision-making boards at a local and state level. This descriptive study involved the analysis of 53 state-level boards in Ohio. Using a master list of boards compiled by the Ohio Nurses on Boards Coalition, Information about each board was collected from agency websites and analyzed to determine board purpose and composition, including the presence of nurses on the board. Data was gathered and synthesized into a matrix for comparison.

Findings: Three (5.6%) boards had nurses on them. Further, out of 509 total state board members, only 13 (2.5%) were nurses. Boards with nurse board members serving include the Ohio Commission on Minority Health, Ohio Board of Nursing, and the State Board of Emergency Medical, Fire, and Transportation Services. Though nurses serve on these health-related boards, all other health-related boards were lacking nursing representation. Nurses provide an essential role in other boards at a state level due to their compassion, regard for the community, leadership abilities, and decision-making skills. Nurses must advocate for themselves and actively pursue roles in both local and state boards as they make valuable additions to many types of decision-making boards.