Abstract Title

Shifting Images: Architecture and identity in the Second Spanish Republic 1931-1937

Abstract

The Spanish Pavilion of the 1937 Paris international expo designed by Lluis Sert and Joseph Luis Lacasa and the Nuevos Ministerios (Madrid) designed by Secundino Zuazo; Commissioned by the same government, represents a shift of communication of two very different traditions that are presented to the rest of the world. What does the shift in architectural style from traditional to modern mean for the Second Spanish Republic? How much of the architectural development and the overall image of Spanish architecture is dictated by the government of the Second Spanish Republic? Zuazo’s Nuevos Ministerios represents the past and everything the Second Spanish Republic represented, while the Spanish Pavilion represented a new approach to Spanish architecture. This research project will further develop the findings of others and shed new light on governmental involvement in the display of identity fitting of Spain.

The Second republican government’s involvement in the representation of an architectural identity has presented a shift in Spain’s image to the world, one of traditional preservation and another of 20th century modernism. In order to approach this concept in its appropriate contexts, the use of primary and secondary sources, such as books, journals, and exerts. From historians such as: Stafford Katherine, Lilia Maure Rubio in her book; Secundino Zuazo Arquitecto, Carlos Flores, and Masterson Algar. Comparing and contrasting, proving and disproving, as well as agreeing or disagreeing with the evidence to support my argument.

Modified Abstract

The Spanish Pavilion of the 1937 Paris international expo designed by Lluis Sert and Joseph Luis Lacasa and the Nuevos Ministerios (Madrid) designed by Secundino Zuazo; Commissioned by the same government, represents a shift of communication of two very different traditions that are presented to the rest of the world. What does the shift in architectural style from traditional to modern mean for the Second Spanish Republic? Zuazo’s Nuevos Ministerios represents the past and what the SSR represented, while the Spanish Pavilion represented a new approach to Spanish architecture. This research project will further develop the findings of others and shed new light on governmental involvement in the display of identity fitting of Spain.

Research Category

Architecture

Author Information

Carl'Drail CannonFollow

Primary Author's Major

Architecture

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Brett Tippey

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

5-4-2018 1:00 PM

Research Area

Architectural History and Criticism | Architecture

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Apr 5th, 1:00 PM

Shifting Images: Architecture and identity in the Second Spanish Republic 1931-1937

The Spanish Pavilion of the 1937 Paris international expo designed by Lluis Sert and Joseph Luis Lacasa and the Nuevos Ministerios (Madrid) designed by Secundino Zuazo; Commissioned by the same government, represents a shift of communication of two very different traditions that are presented to the rest of the world. What does the shift in architectural style from traditional to modern mean for the Second Spanish Republic? How much of the architectural development and the overall image of Spanish architecture is dictated by the government of the Second Spanish Republic? Zuazo’s Nuevos Ministerios represents the past and everything the Second Spanish Republic represented, while the Spanish Pavilion represented a new approach to Spanish architecture. This research project will further develop the findings of others and shed new light on governmental involvement in the display of identity fitting of Spain.

The Second republican government’s involvement in the representation of an architectural identity has presented a shift in Spain’s image to the world, one of traditional preservation and another of 20th century modernism. In order to approach this concept in its appropriate contexts, the use of primary and secondary sources, such as books, journals, and exerts. From historians such as: Stafford Katherine, Lilia Maure Rubio in her book; Secundino Zuazo Arquitecto, Carlos Flores, and Masterson Algar. Comparing and contrasting, proving and disproving, as well as agreeing or disagreeing with the evidence to support my argument.