Abstract Title

Victim/Perpetrator Gender Dyads and the Risk of PTSD and SUD Comorbidity

Abstract

Sexual assault preceding comorbid Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Substance Use Disorders (SUDs) has been widely established, but the nuanced influences of the gender of the victim and perpetrator bare further examination. This study sought to examine which victim/perpetrator gender dyad (female/male, female/female, male/female, male/male) leads to a greater risk of comorbidity of PTSD and SUD. Men are more likely to have an SUD, but women are more likely to turn to substances because of trauma (Nida, 2016; Truchman, 2010). While many other factors play into the development of PTSD/SUD comorbidity, research suggests that that sexual trauma is an especially high-risk factor (Dworkin et al., 2017). The most common victimization dyad is female victims with male preparators (female/male dyad) (Dube et al., 2005). Thus, the study hypothesized that female victims with male perpetrators (the female/male dyad) would exhibit the highest PTSD/SUD comorbidity.

Potential participants were recruited from the ADM Crisis Center in Summit County, Ohio. The center offers detoxification to patients presenting with an SUD upon admission, and more than half of our sample also met diagnostic criteria for comorbid-PTSD. Participants were administered questionnaires, including the PCL (PTSD screen), ASSIST (SUD inventory), and SES-SFV (sexual trauma inventory) to gather data. Data is in the process of being analyzed, and will be presented at the poster presentation.

Modified Abstract

This study sought to examine which victim/perpetrator gender dyad (female/male, female/female, male/female, male/male) leads to a greater risk of comorbidity of PTSD and SUD following a sexual assault. Research suggests that that sexual trauma is an especially high-risk factor (Dworkin et al., 2017). The most common victimization dyad is female victims with male preparators (female/male dyad) (Dube et al., 2005). Thus, the study hypothesized that female victims with male perpetrators (the female/male dyad) would exhibit the highest PTSD/SUD comorbidity.

Potential participants were recruited from the ADM Crisis Center in Summit County, Ohio. Participants were administered questionnaires, including the PCL (PTSD screen), ASSIST (SUD inventory), and SES-SFV (sexual trauma inventory).

Research Category

Psychology

Author Information

Inola HoweFollow

Primary Author's Major

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Ms. Angela Junglen

Mentor #2 Information

Ms. Monica Garcia

Mentor #3 Information

Ms. Anna Wise

Mentor #4 Information

Dr. Douglas Delahanty

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

5-4-2018 1:00 PM

Research Area

Clinical Psychology | Psychiatric and Mental Health | Psychological Phenomena and Processes | Substance Abuse and Addiction

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Apr 5th, 1:00 PM

Victim/Perpetrator Gender Dyads and the Risk of PTSD and SUD Comorbidity

Sexual assault preceding comorbid Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Substance Use Disorders (SUDs) has been widely established, but the nuanced influences of the gender of the victim and perpetrator bare further examination. This study sought to examine which victim/perpetrator gender dyad (female/male, female/female, male/female, male/male) leads to a greater risk of comorbidity of PTSD and SUD. Men are more likely to have an SUD, but women are more likely to turn to substances because of trauma (Nida, 2016; Truchman, 2010). While many other factors play into the development of PTSD/SUD comorbidity, research suggests that that sexual trauma is an especially high-risk factor (Dworkin et al., 2017). The most common victimization dyad is female victims with male preparators (female/male dyad) (Dube et al., 2005). Thus, the study hypothesized that female victims with male perpetrators (the female/male dyad) would exhibit the highest PTSD/SUD comorbidity.

Potential participants were recruited from the ADM Crisis Center in Summit County, Ohio. The center offers detoxification to patients presenting with an SUD upon admission, and more than half of our sample also met diagnostic criteria for comorbid-PTSD. Participants were administered questionnaires, including the PCL (PTSD screen), ASSIST (SUD inventory), and SES-SFV (sexual trauma inventory) to gather data. Data is in the process of being analyzed, and will be presented at the poster presentation.