Abstract Title

Literacy Assessment in Deaf/Hard of Hearing Students Using Miscue Analysis

Abstract

The problem that deaf/hard of hearing students tend to face is that their on standardized reading tests, scores tend to be significantly lower than that of their hearing peers. The aim of this study is to find ways we can improve literacy assessment in deaf/hard of hearing students that will lead to improved instruction. I will perform a miscue analysis with scored retelling, and compare this with the standardized test scores for one middle school age student. The student will read the story to the best of their ability and retell the story to assess their reading accuracy and comprehension. Once finished the evaluator critiques how he or she read the short story by marking the story with the following codes; omissions, additions, substitutions, self-correction and repetition, the student gets scored on how major or minor the misuses are (-1,.5). The total miscues are subtracted from the total words then divided by the total words to get a percentage. That percentage is the percent of words correctly read by the student. The student is asked to retell the story and is scored out of 10 to get a score on their comprehension. A 99% accuracy on the miscue analysis is considered excellent and an 85% or higher on the retelling is considered excellent. Based on the results that are found, teachers will implement interventions to improve the student's overall scores. This will be compared with the student’s latest Ohio and standardized test scores in terms of quality and type of information.

Modified Abstract

The problem that deaf/hard of hearing students tend to face is that their on standardized reading test, scores tending to be significantly lower than that of their hearing peers. The aim of this study is to find ways in which we can improve literacy assessment in deaf/hard of hearing students that will lead to improved instruction. I will perform a miscue analysis to evaluate the student. In this analysis, the student has to read the story then I will evaluate their transcript and total the miscues. The student is then asked to retell the story for a comprehension check. Teachers will use the information gained to plan reading interventions for the student.

Research Category

Social Science/Education/Public Health

Author Information

Anna GibsonFollow

Primary Author's Major

Special Education

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Pamela Luft

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

5-4-2018 1:00 PM

Research Area

Education

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Apr 5th, 1:00 PM

Literacy Assessment in Deaf/Hard of Hearing Students Using Miscue Analysis

The problem that deaf/hard of hearing students tend to face is that their on standardized reading tests, scores tend to be significantly lower than that of their hearing peers. The aim of this study is to find ways we can improve literacy assessment in deaf/hard of hearing students that will lead to improved instruction. I will perform a miscue analysis with scored retelling, and compare this with the standardized test scores for one middle school age student. The student will read the story to the best of their ability and retell the story to assess their reading accuracy and comprehension. Once finished the evaluator critiques how he or she read the short story by marking the story with the following codes; omissions, additions, substitutions, self-correction and repetition, the student gets scored on how major or minor the misuses are (-1,.5). The total miscues are subtracted from the total words then divided by the total words to get a percentage. That percentage is the percent of words correctly read by the student. The student is asked to retell the story and is scored out of 10 to get a score on their comprehension. A 99% accuracy on the miscue analysis is considered excellent and an 85% or higher on the retelling is considered excellent. Based on the results that are found, teachers will implement interventions to improve the student's overall scores. This will be compared with the student’s latest Ohio and standardized test scores in terms of quality and type of information.