Event Title

Art Restitution after World War I: Historical, Legal, and Ethical Approaches for Museum Professionals

Presenter Information

Jillian Decker, Walsh University

Location

124 Science & Nursing Building

Start Date

27-4-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

27-4-2018 9:25 AM

Description

World War I is one of the most researched topics in history, with repercussions still impacting the international museum community. The Nazis looted an estimated one-third of Europe's art. Because of this, works of art ended up scattered across Europe and the U.S., both in public museum collections and hidden in private collections. Internationally, restitution efforts began again in the 1990s, arising from the field of Holocaust Era Art Restitution. Since then, museums have been at the center of legal battles, conferences, and national declarations. This study will explain the historical context, and then use a case study of a recent dispute over Holocaust-looted art in a museum as an example. The goal is to create a framework for museum professionals who strive to practice high ethical standards regarding the restitution of works looted in connection with the events of World War I.

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Apr 27th, 9:00 AM Apr 27th, 9:25 AM

Art Restitution after World War I: Historical, Legal, and Ethical Approaches for Museum Professionals

124 Science & Nursing Building

World War I is one of the most researched topics in history, with repercussions still impacting the international museum community. The Nazis looted an estimated one-third of Europe's art. Because of this, works of art ended up scattered across Europe and the U.S., both in public museum collections and hidden in private collections. Internationally, restitution efforts began again in the 1990s, arising from the field of Holocaust Era Art Restitution. Since then, museums have been at the center of legal battles, conferences, and national declarations. This study will explain the historical context, and then use a case study of a recent dispute over Holocaust-looted art in a museum as an example. The goal is to create a framework for museum professionals who strive to practice high ethical standards regarding the restitution of works looted in connection with the events of World War I.