Event Title

Representations of Grief in Mrs. Dalloway

Location

217 Science & Nursing Building

Start Date

27-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

27-4-2018 2:45 PM

Description

Critics have made an effort to highlight trauma recovery in Virginia Woolf's “Mrs. Dalloway”, but little to no effort has been made to highlight grief recovery in this narrative. After a loss, grief is the healing process that helps the pain of the loss decrease over time. Trauma is the emotional response to a terrible event in life. Grief and trauma can occur together and be interconnected, but they are not the same thing. In approaching the reading of “Mrs. Dalloway” as a modernist narrative, I rely on the theories of feminism and trauma to show how grief can be viewed in the same light as trauma. Mrs. Dalloway's social and cultural milieu presents no opportunities for the characters to mourn or grieve their losses or "come out" about their sexuality. All of the characters in one way or another are affected by death, mourning and grief in “Mrs. Dalloway.”

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Apr 27th, 2:15 PM Apr 27th, 2:45 PM

Representations of Grief in Mrs. Dalloway

217 Science & Nursing Building

Critics have made an effort to highlight trauma recovery in Virginia Woolf's “Mrs. Dalloway”, but little to no effort has been made to highlight grief recovery in this narrative. After a loss, grief is the healing process that helps the pain of the loss decrease over time. Trauma is the emotional response to a terrible event in life. Grief and trauma can occur together and be interconnected, but they are not the same thing. In approaching the reading of “Mrs. Dalloway” as a modernist narrative, I rely on the theories of feminism and trauma to show how grief can be viewed in the same light as trauma. Mrs. Dalloway's social and cultural milieu presents no opportunities for the characters to mourn or grieve their losses or "come out" about their sexuality. All of the characters in one way or another are affected by death, mourning and grief in “Mrs. Dalloway.”