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2018
Friday, April 27th
8:00 AM

Combating Gun Violence in Schools: How to Help the Boys

Brooke Giebel, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

8:00 AM - 8:25 AM

School shootings are on the rise, and affected communities are reaching out to legislators in every way that they can, including the March for Our Lives on Saturday, March 24, 2018, all across the nation. The purpose of my research is to identify additional warning signs and orient assistance to children who may be most at risk for violent outbursts of that nature. It is important, now more than ever, to be identifying students' potential for violence as systematically and authentically as possible. From 1960-1990, a 30-year period, there were 53 school shootings. From 1990-2018 there have been over 200. The only thing they have in common is that they were committed by boys. Active shooters have invariably been men, but our discussion of prevention targets students indiscriminately.

It is not possible to understand this definitively, but there is evidence that it is due to the differences in frontal lobe development, verbal skills, myelination, and testosterone levels between boys and girls. In addition to reading several academic journal articles, I interviewed a high school teacher with experience dealing with at-risk youth to supplement my findings as well as interviews with the teachers and parents of school shooters conducted by third-party interviewers. It is impossible to say with certainty what causes school shooters to do what they do, but through the analysis of the shooters we can begin to discern areas of concern where we can focus our efforts to stop this violence. Men are not inherently the problem, but between biological and social factors they are the overwhelming source of gun violence both in schools and out.

The Blood of the Covenant is Thicker than the Water of the Womb: Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistlestop Café and Non-Familial Relationships

Mary Metzger, Kent State University - Stark Campus

217 Science & Nursing Building

8:00 AM - 8:25 AM

This paper discusses the role non-familial relationships portrayed within Fannie Flagg's novel, "Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistlestop Café" and how their comparison with the familial, or "blood" relationships have an impact on the characterization. Divided into two sections, this paper looks at Idgie's role in the town and her relationships gathered there, specifically with Ruth, Stump, and Big George; and the relationship that Ninny and Evelyn form during Evelyn's visits to the nursing home, resulting in Ninny essentially saving Evelyn's life.

The Journey to Commencement and Beyond

Rikki Kadri, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

8:00 AM - 8:25 AM

The dedication, sacrifice, and hard work that was put into obtaining an undergraduate degree had paid off, right? As the Commencement Song ends and the tassel has been switched to the other side of the cap, the next morning implies the "dream job" is starting, right? Or it could mean the adventure to Graduate school awaits the next semester? All the ideas of life are magically going as planned, and everything is lined up and ready to go, right? For a large population of college students, this isn't the case. This study explores the abundant amount of students who are undecided in where their journey leads them after Commencement, and into the world beyond their undergraduate life. While providing visual displays of pathways to connect students with campus support and resources, as well as, to help guide students on their exploration on where the journey is leading next.

8:30 AM

An Underground History: London’s Forty Elephants

Demi Edwards, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

8:30 AM - 8:55 AM

Often, women in organized crime are seen as inferior to men because of a preconceived notion that surrounded women of the early twentieth-century. Comparing the women in the various classes to the women of the Forty Elephants, along with the gangs of men shows a pattern of crime that has easily earned itself a place in history in its own right. Women or the goals of women were different than the men. By defining what organized crime in England was, what types of women turned to organized crime, and discovering their motivations to turning to crime rather than being involved in a more traditional role it will help add to the historiography as proof that women and men were playing in the same underground world, but with slightly different motivations. The Forty Elephants had their own system of committing crime and it was one that is well worth examining.

Interventional Methodologies for American Military Veterans with PTSD and Comorbid Disorders: A Literature Review

Fred Hutson, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

8:30 AM - 8:55 AM

The purpose of this literature review is to identify the existing interventional methods currently employed by mental health professionals in a multitude of settings, from private mental health practices to Veterans Affairs (VA) clinics and other facilities. Numerous studies exist in the interventional methods used to treat Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), including veterans from many of this nation’s conflicts, ranging from the Korean Conflict, the Vietnam War, and the War on Terror in both Iraq and Afghanistan. The VA cites numerous interventional methodologies for treating PTSD in American military veterans, such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and exposure therapy (ET) to name a few. This review will encompass veterans from the conflicts listed above and will include those individuals with a diagnosis of PTSD and those with a comorbid diagnosis to gauge effectiveness of interventional methods used to treat the disorder alone or with an associated disorder.

The Effects of Amazon Go on the U.S. Economy

Madison Miller, Kent State University - Stark Campus

217 Science & Nursing Building

8:30 AM - 8:55 AM

Amazon has continuously proven to be a powerful and successful company and with the company's newest installment of Amazon Go. It brings many questions about the future of retail. The goal of Amazon Go is to incorporate the use of technology into the typical retail experience to eliminate the requirement of waiting in a checkout line. To achieve this, an app must be downloaded onto a smartphone to gain entrance to the store. Once inside, the technology embedded throughout the store detects what you purchase and charges you for said items after exiting the store. While many people are fascinated by this new technological convenience store, many questions arise about how this new type of retailing will affect the economic state of our country. Unfortunately, the state of our economy has been an issue that many Americans have been concerned about for years, so this paper will go in-depth on how Amazon Go can influence several macroeconomic indicators, such as unemployment, gross domestic product, and inflation. This paper argues that Amazon Go is a gateway to a new type of retail, and can transform the state of the economy for better or for worse depending on its course of action.

9:00 AM

Art Restitution after World War I: Historical, Legal, and Ethical Approaches for Museum Professionals

Jillian Decker, Walsh University

124 Science & Nursing Building

9:00 AM - 9:25 AM

World War I is one of the most researched topics in history, with repercussions still impacting the international museum community. The Nazis looted an estimated one-third of Europe's art. Because of this, works of art ended up scattered across Europe and the U.S., both in public museum collections and hidden in private collections. Internationally, restitution efforts began again in the 1990s, arising from the field of Holocaust Era Art Restitution. Since then, museums have been at the center of legal battles, conferences, and national declarations. This study will explain the historical context, and then use a case study of a recent dispute over Holocaust-looted art in a museum as an example. The goal is to create a framework for museum professionals who strive to practice high ethical standards regarding the restitution of works looted in connection with the events of World War I.

Exploring the Secrets of the Symbol

Marissa Hoover

217 Science & Nursing Building

9:00 AM - 9:25 AM

This paper analyzes the importance of symbols in relation to the religious themes of fourteenth-century Europe, specifically Florence, Italy. With reference to a symbol found on the rooftop of Orsanmichele, this paper breaks down the current historiography of the way symbols are researched with comparisons to heraldry, masonry marks, and medieval graffiti. In addition, the argument states that the position of the symbol found on Orsanmichele is related to the fourteenth-century conceptions of the Virgin Mary, while also noting its possible characterization as a heraldic symbol, mason mark, or medieval graffiti. In doing so, comparisons can be made to how symbols have been analyzed and how symbols can give insight to religious conceptions of Christian Saints.

The Benefits and Uses Of IDEA

Martel Carpenter, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

9:00 AM - 9:25 AM

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Plan, better known as IDEA, is a mandate that requires students with disabilities receive the things that they may need to be successful in an academic setting. These things include evaluation and determination, appropriate education and an Individualized Education Plans in the Least Restrictive Environment (Santrock, p. 200). I have taken a personal interest in the way IDEA affects children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Behavior Disorders. I have interviewed and taken time at Massillon Washington High School in a Special Education setting, as well as viewed various scholarly journal articles in an attempt to seek further information on how IDEA is used to give these students a proper education and how the teachers directly involved benefit from it. I will be concluding my research in the upcoming weeks and hope to show the benefits and uses of IDEA.

9:30 AM

Cannabinoid Mediated Inhibition of Ovarian Cancer Cell Proliferation is Mediated via Oxidative stress

Bert Crawford, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

9:30 AM - 9:55 AM

I hypothesized that the cytotoxic effects of cannabinoids will be mediated via cannabinoid (CB) receptors and cannabinoids will increase the cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). SKOV3 cell viability was determined in the presence of WST-1 reagent. Mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential (Δψm) were observed with Mitotracker Green FM and tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM). ROS were visualized with 5-(and 6)-chloromethyl-2’,7’-dichlorohydrofluorescein diacetate (CM-H2DCFDA) and dihydroethidium (DHE). The plasma membrane of the cells became permeable to Nuclear Green Dead dye. ROS was also increased in the cannabinoid-treated cells but the cytotoxic effects were not reverse by either CB1 (Rimonabant) or CB2 (AM630) receptor antagonist. Although the antioxidant α-tocopherol (vitamin E) was able to prevent the induction of cytotoxicity, water-soluble Trolox and ascorbic acid were unable to do so.

Partners in Crime or a Better Half?: A Comparison of the Friend and Assistant Relationships with Victor Frankenstein in "Frankenstein" and Film

Bethany Earley, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

9:30 AM - 9:55 AM

Within Mary Shelley's novel, "Frankenstein", the friend character of Henry Clerval plays an important role in influencing Victor Frankenstein. Many film adaptations disregard this role of the friend, especially the 1931 version which situates Frankenstein between a relatively indifferent assistant and a false friend. The 2015 film, "Victor Frankenstein", seeks to revitalize the importance of the role that relationships played on Victor within the novel. Despite this attempt, the nature of the friendship between Igor and Victor in the film is not equal the one shown in the novel due to the inequality of the friendship portrayed in the movie. My work shows that while this move towards enforcing the importance of relationships on Victor's choices is improved in "Victor Frankenstein", it still does not give due diligence to the importance of friendship which can be seen with Henry Clerval in the novel.

The Impact of Valuing Employees within an Organization

Michael Caiazza, Kent State University - Stark Campus

217 Science & Nursing Building

9:30 AM - 9:55 AM

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between employee treatment and work productivity and satisfaction. This study is interested in the dialogue and communicative practice of employers with employees, particularly those in entry level positions, and how those interactions change over time, from the on-boarding process through employee socialization and assimilation experiences. As such, this study will focus on how entry level employees frame their work satisfaction, compensation, relationships and intentions to stay with the organization as they reflect on the experience of joining the organization and subsequent interactions thereafter with peers, superiors and the organization as a whole. The study correlates with Stanley Deetz's Critical Theory of Communication within Organizations. I plan on presenting the paper that will showcase my results and findings from the research.

10:00 AM

Dust of English: The History and Interpretation of English Grammar

Devin Myers, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

The following piece brushes over a brief history of the English language and contributors to its grammar. Once the "father of modern linguistics" established his theories, we move forward in time and witness modern-day experiments taking place putting Chomsky's fundamental grammar theories of "innate reactions" to the test. Once taking a breather from English grammar, we'll notice some of the influential dialects that English has succumb to within its infancy. These influences from centuries ago have affected our modern-day language as we know it. We don't seem to think about how our language was created and the time that was invested in creating its scaffolding for what it is today. Once brushing off the dust of English, we'll be able to rediscover our roots as modern day English speakers and pay homage to the individuals that prescribed us with it.

10:30 AM

Parental Opinions of Combination Treatment of Medication and Interactive Metronome with Children with ADHD

Matthew Lenz, Walsh University

128 Science & Nursing Building

10:30 AM - 10:55 AM

This research study was conducted to further the research in the treatment options for children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. While past research has shown that stimulant medication alone is sufficient to treat the symptoms of ADHD; there has been a push for a combination of medication and therapy as the most effective treatment option. Using parents who have children with ADHD and parents who do not have children with ADHD, the study will gather the opinions of parents about whether or not they would be interested in having their child to receive combination therapy and their reasoning behind that. The study also gauged the parents' awareness and reservations about the treatment option.

Psychological Manifestations of Microbial Infections: A Case for the Inclusion of Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS) and Chronic Lyme Disease

Haley Walker, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

10:30 AM - 10:55 AM

Some acute microbial infections can have long-lasting symptoms. Byproducts of the infection can cross the bloodbrain- barrier causing psychological manifestations. Depending on the original diagnosis, these manifestations can either be treated as such, misdiagnosed as another disorder with similar symptoms, or completely disregarded. Two well-known and widely accepted infections known to cause mental status changes are Toxoplasmosis and Syphilis. Two lesser known and not very widely accepted disorders that are said to cause altered mental statuses are Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS) and Lyme disease. My goal in this presentation is to uncover the similarities and differences between these four diseases and explain why two are accepted by the CDC and healthcare workers as causing mental status changes, while the other two are ignored. To accomplish this goal, I will present evidence in the form of primary scientific literature searches, interviews with healthcare professionals on both sides of the issue, and visual representations.

The Prevalence and Influence of a Multicultural Education in a Small School Setting

Austin Ord, Kent State University - Stark Campus

217 Science & Nursing Building

10:30 AM - 10:55 AM

In my research I plan to assess the extent and influence of a smaller school's multicultural education. A multicultural education is defined by its inclusion of educational materials, ideals, and even people from a variety of cultural groups. This is a subject in need of exploration because it's common for people to see a multicultural education as beneficial only to students with different cultural backgrounds than the dominant American culture. The dominant American culture in this context refers to the over saturation of white men's ideas and contributions to American society. With the mindset that a multicultural education is exclusively beneficial to minority groups, it is easier for smaller predominantly white schools to gloss over the incorporation of a multicultural curriculum. I plan on using sources of information such as scholarly articles, books, web articles, and academic journals. Along with these sources of information I will in the upcoming week's conduct two interviews with secondary social studies teachers in a smaller predominantly white school. I will ask them questions to gauge the presence of a multicultural education and its influences in the school. Once I have gathered the information from the teachers I will use it in combination with my other research to answer the following questions. How does a social studies teacher in a predominantly white school incorporate the principles of a multicultural education? What is included in their multicultural curriculum based on student body? How does the school's multicultural education influence its students?

11:00 AM

Jumbo Crowley: An Examination of Canton’s Biggest Name in Crime

Griffin Angerman, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

11:00 AM - 11:25 AM

This paper explores the unstudied subject of Canton Ohio's place in the history of organized crime during the age of prohibition. While it is widely accepted that Canton was a center for criminal activity, little has been written on any specifics. Many works that mention organized crime within Canton make reference to a gangster by the name of "Jumbo" Crowley. It is apparent that Crowley is a significant figure when it comes to organized crime in Canton, yet he is not studied or documented. This paper seeks to study Crowley and his operations within Canton, and in doing so write a history of the biggest name in crime in Canton. By examining newspaper stories, police reports, and court cases that involve both Crowley himself and his subordinates, it becomes possible to determine what Crowley's influence was within Canton. This paper will argue that Crowley, more than any other individual, was the driving force for organized crime in Canton.

The historiography of Canton's history of organized crime is small, mainly focusing on the killing of Donald Mellett, and the corruption that existed within Canton's police force. This paper will approach the question of corruption from a different point of view. Where the history of Donald Mellett looks at the uncovering of corruption through Mellett's work, this paper will investigate the corruption that existed in the local government that was connected to Crowley. This paper will construct a narrative of Crowley's criminal career, and in the process shine a light on Canton's connection to organized crime, and the corruption that came along with it.

Panel: Communication Research in Society

Allison Blocher, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Michael Caiazza, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Joanne Stallard, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

11:00 AM - 11:45 AM

In this panel, students will present their communication research in society projects, which identify and describe selected communication concepts and show their relevance in current events. The panel chair will provide a short introduction and context of the projects. By describing key communication theories and linking them to current news events, students will demonstrate the relevance of their academic training in their civic lives post-graduation.

11:30 AM

More than medicine: the role of physical activity, psychological interventions, and religion and culture in a primary care medical setting

Harry Price, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

11:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Within the medial field, a large interest has been rising in the role of preventative medicine and alternative treatments in addition to traditional pharmacological approaches. A literature search of PsycINFO and Medline was performed on the role of physical activity, psychological interventions such as cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness, and religion and culture in the primary care medical setting. All three of these approaches have been shown to have physical, mental, and economical benefits for patients and physicians alike. Barriers to increasing these three fields in the medical setting are discussed, along with suggestions for successful implementation for optimal patient centered care, health, and physician well-being.

The Purpose of the Puritans Migrating to America in the 1630s

Jordon Smith, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

11:30 AM - 12:00 PM

This paper explores the main purpose for Puritans, who did not separate in doctrine from the Church of England, settling in America. The historiography primarily is focused on the desire for religious freedom and independency as well as the economic promise of America. A further investigation of sermons and essays written by the Puritans reveals the Puritan's wanted to correct, not brake away from, the Church of England. Several documented sermons and writings from the 1630s-1700 either specifically explain the Puritans purpose to restore or they make connections to scripture to imply the purpose. John Winthrop spoke of the Puritans as being A City Upon a Hill, a community that had the power to end corruption. Samuel Danforth, likewise, compared the Puritans to John the Baptizer as they were also going into the wilderness (America) to speak the truth. Richard Mather wrote of the covenant between God and the Church of England, and how the Anglican Church could be restored. John Cotton spoke of the sinfulness of separating from the Church of England, since it was still a true church that needed to be restored. The Congregational Puritans did not come to America to establish their own religion or to prosper economically. They came to do God's will, to correct and restore a member of His body.

1:15 PM

Intersections in Modern Sonic Arts: Reviews on the Use of Non-Musical Sound

Nicholas Taylor, Kent State University

101 Science & Nursing Building

1:15 PM - 1:45 PM

To challenge ourselves artistically, we must challenge our existing notions of art. In the case of the sonic arts we must move beyond the frameworks in which we perceive sound. Attempting to only interpret sonic art and sound through a musical lens limits our understanding of art as a whole. The are many other meritorious forms of art the make use of sound and challenge our notions of art and the establishments in which they reside. This is no more obvious than in the ideals of anti-art movements such as Futurism (especially Russolo's "The Art of Noise") and Post-Dada Fluxus; and modern Sound Collage and Noise "musics." These art forms and movements actively challenge, and often transcend, traditional frameworks for music and make use of non-musical sound. Understanding other ways in which sound can be used and the contexts it can be used gives us a broader understanding of and appreciation of art outside of the visual and musical. This presentation will explore the commonalities amongst the aforementioned establishments and will highlight intersections in the use of non-musical sound and in what ways it is effectively manipulated.

Latino Medication Management: An Examination into the Factors that Influence Medication Adherence

Chelsea Craft, Walsh University

128 Science & Nursing Building

1:15 PM - 1:45 PM

Latinos in the United States have less access to health care services compared to people of any other ethnicity or race. This is a critical concern considering the continually increasing size of the U.S. Latino population, especially in Ohio. The decreased utilization of healthcare services often interferes with the patient's adherence to his or her medications. The objective of this study was to see how influential the factors of communication, rapport, importance of taking medications, and concern for side effects, were on medication adherence in Latinos living in Northeast Ohio. This was completed using a modified survey created for the National Community Pharmacists Association. Understanding how influential certain factors are on adherence can determine how to best address these barriers and improve medication adherence in the future.

Proboscis Architecture of Hybrid Limenitis Butterflies: A Post-zygotic reproductive / Isolating Mechanism and an Example of Haldane’s Rule

Val Kramer, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

1:15 PM - 1:45 PM

Reproductive isolating mechanisms evolve to reduce the sharing of alleles among groups where reproduction does not result in offspring, or results in offspring with lower fitness. Occasionally, individuals from genetically different populations mate and produce hybrid offspring. Post-zygotic reproductive isolating mechanisms affect the hybrid individual and can be intrinsic (developmental problem) or extrinsic (individual is incompatible with its environment). The viceroy (Limenitis archippus) and red spotted purple (Limenitis arthemis astyanax) are two closely related species of butterfly native to North America that are capable of hybridizing. This study looks at the proboscis morphology of Limenitis archippus and Limenitis arthemis astyanax, as well as their hybrid “rubidus” form. Proboscis architecture relates to its function, and each structure has an impact on fluid uptake abilities (nutrient acquisition), making its architecture fundamental to the individuals fitness. We hypothesize that hybrid butterflies might have proboscises with reduced functionality, impairing feeding ability, thus acting as a post-zygotic reproductive isolating mechanism. To test this, we measured eleven structures on each proboscis and compared measurements among species groups. Recorded measurements supported the hypothesis that hybrid Limenitis butterflies might have reduced proboscis functionality, which would hinder fluid uptake, and ultimately reduce hybrid fitness.

1:45 PM

Ohio, Newspapers, Political Cartoons, and Voting Records: How All of These Relate in the Election of 1912

Demi Edwards, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

1:45 PM - 2:15 PM

Using Ohio newspaper political cartoons to create an analysis on how the media has an effect on the voting population. The players from the 1912 presidential election came from the two major political parties, Republican and Democrats, along with the Progressive "Bull Moose" party. Due to the dependency of the newspaper media, as the medium was one of cheapest and accessible to the most amount of people. By looking at historically right and left leaning news sources it is possible to observe the biases of each side because there is always a specific narrative portrayed in political cartoons for each presidential candidate. A cartoonist can present their own opinions of a candidate which would cause them to exaggerate certain characteristics to sway the public perception of an individual candidate. Therefore, by putting all factor together it can be shown that there is a correlation between newspaper cartoons and voting records.

Once You Stumble ‚ Human Nature is on You: Septimus Warren Smith‚ Gender Nonconformity & Suicide in Mrs. Dalloway

John Polles, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

1:45 PM - 2:15 PM

The Booming World of Cryptocurrency

Amanda Blind, Kent State University - Stark Campus

217 Science & Nursing Building

1:45 PM - 2:15 PM

Cryptocurrency is a digital or virtual currency that uses cryptography, or the practice of techniques for secure communication in the presence of third parties, for security. Cryptocurrency has blown up in the past couple of years and many new cryptocurrencies emerge every day, Bitcoin being the biggest and most well-known. Satoshi Nakamoto, the inventor of Bitcoin, found a way to build a digital cash system without a central entity. This new way of sending and receiving money boomed because it is so secure that it cannot be counterfeited, nor can any bank or government interfere with any cryptocurrency. This new cryptocurrency could potentially be our future because of its security and many people are turning to it to protect themselves against the devaluation of their national currency. I will further address some of the challenges that cryptocurrencies face in the future with regards to legislature and viability.

2:15 PM

Benjamin Franklin: ambassador for independence

Briant Bowman, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

2:15 PM - 2:45 PM

Benjamin Franklin has long been viewed as multi-faced; his credits to history include writer, inventor, politician, scientist and philosopher. However, his talent as an American diplomat, particularly in France, has not received much appeal in historiographic circles. Historiography has focused on Franklin's achievements at home and his work on behalf of the United States in Great Britain. The importance of his duties as Minister to France were vital to American Independence, and merits admiration as well.

This paper examines Benjamin Franklin's indispensable role in securing this alliance. The paper provides convincing evidence, through primary materials, that Benjamin Franklin was the necessary American commissioner. Without his assistance, French aid to America's struggling war effort would not have been forthcoming, thus independence would not have occurred. The importance of this paper suggests that American history would have taken a very different course if Franklin had not been a diplomat working for American interests in Paris.

This study includes supporting evidence that America's military victory over the British depended on French intervention, and that the revolution undertaken in the United States would serve as inspiration for the French to pursue their own revolution less than a decade later. This paper strives to contribute to the historiography of American diplomatic history through the examination of Benjamin Franklin's role as an ambassador to France during the Revolutionary War, and to further his contribution as seen in the historiographic discipline.

Representations of Grief in Mrs. Dalloway

Brittany Olson, Kent State University - Stark Campus

217 Science & Nursing Building

2:15 PM - 2:45 PM

Critics have made an effort to highlight trauma recovery in Virginia Woolf's “Mrs. Dalloway”, but little to no effort has been made to highlight grief recovery in this narrative. After a loss, grief is the healing process that helps the pain of the loss decrease over time. Trauma is the emotional response to a terrible event in life. Grief and trauma can occur together and be interconnected, but they are not the same thing. In approaching the reading of “Mrs. Dalloway” as a modernist narrative, I rely on the theories of feminism and trauma to show how grief can be viewed in the same light as trauma. Mrs. Dalloway's social and cultural milieu presents no opportunities for the characters to mourn or grieve their losses or "come out" about their sexuality. All of the characters in one way or another are affected by death, mourning and grief in “Mrs. Dalloway.”

The Role of Childhood Trauma in Adult Semantic and Episodic Memory Performance

Donald Larabee, Kent State University - Salem Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

2:15 PM - 2:45 PM

In this study, we examine the effects of childhood trauma on long term memory. Specifically, we hypothesized that people who experience childhood trauma would have an enhanced semantic memory and reduced episodic memory, in both quality and quantity of remembered items. Using an online survey, participants read two stories and later answered a series of questions. Demographic information was also collected at the end of the survey, including whether or not the participant had experienced trauma previously in their life, and self-rated episodic and semantic memory, GPA, and memories from three time periods in childhood. We found that trauma was associated with self-rated assessments of memories from childhood. In addition, we found that participants' self-rating for episodic memory function was a good predictor for their performance in the semantic portions of the study.

2:45 PM

An Analysis of Fried Green Tomatoes through Critical Race Theory

Annika Johnson, Kent State University - Stark Campus

124 Science & Nursing Building

2:45 PM - 3:15 PM

What message does Fried Green Tomatoes send about race relations and African American representation? I am using the structure of Critical Race Theory to analyze the characters of the novel, their relationships, motivations and actions, and relate it to the history of African American representation in American literature. My purpose is to reveal where Flagg has successfully broken away from reductive portrayals and what problems still remain. Characters will be compared and contrasted with stereotypes such as the Mammy and Uncle Tom. Of special note is the unerring supportiveness of the black characters, namely Big George, Sipsey, and Onzell, toward the white Threadgoodes and whether it plays into the "Magical Negro" stock character type.

3:15 PM

Logging Death at Sea: A Study of How Deaths Were Recorded in Woodes Rogers’ "A Cruising Voyage Round the World"

Bethany Earley, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

3:15 PM - 3:45 PM

Life at sea had many dangers associated with it, and long voyages often meant that there were many deaths aboard ships. Woodes Rogers' privateering circumnavigation near the beginning of the eighteenth century is one example of an endeavor with many casualties. By studying the way in which Rogers recorded the deaths of the men who were on the voyage, a better understanding of the different motivations behind the mentions of the sailors’ deaths can be seen to stem from three primary factors, including the captain's familiarity with the man, the captain's writing style, and the events surrounding the deaths. By studying the various types of entries that Rogers wrote in the account of his voyage, a better understanding of why and how deaths were logged at sea can be reached.

Refining Realism and Diluting Duality: Considerations of Quality, Value, and Technology present in Robert Pirsig's "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance"

Bryan Myers, Kent State University - Stark Campus

217 Science & Nursing Building

3:15 PM - 3:45 PM

In his novel, "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance", Robert Pirsig considers philosophical questions associated with Quality and Value from the perspective of maintaining the proper tuning and performance of a motorcycle for not only proper function of the cycle itself, but also from that of the cyclist being fully in tune with understanding the underlying forms of the mechanical systems and processes working together to propel the union of cycle and cyclist forward. Not only through time and space but toward enlightened understanding and quality of being. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight Robert Pirsig's discussions on quality and value, including the ideas of "value rigidity" and "stuckness", relating them to technological advancements and anxieties. Bringing the discussion to close with a brief reflection about today's smart-everything-technologies and how to apply "Zen" ideas toward maintaining them forward.

The Effects of the American Revolution on American Social Life

Michael Weinstock, Kent State University

124 Science & Nursing Building

3:15 PM - 3:45 PM

The majority of historiography and literature regarding the American Revolution has a heavy focus on political or economic aspects of the war. Most often, historians points to factors such as taxation, the Enlightenment, or broader threats to absolute monarchy that affected European empires in the late eighteenth century. Analyses of the effects of the revolution, as well, tend to focus on new trade routes, political precedents, and the emergence of the United States as a new power on the world stage. When social impacts are discussed, they are frequently skimmed over as historians attempt to ensure readers that the American Revolution did indeed alter the social landscape of the young country as they so often claim it did politically or economically. However, this paper seeks to examine social impacts of the revolution, especially in terms of Loyalist men and Patriot women, in further detail to determine whether any social change occurred. This paper also intends to investigate what motivated any new trends in order to more fully understand if social change brought on by the American Revolution is just as dramatic as often assumed. The majority of this paper analyzes primary source documents regarding Loyalists and Patriot women written before, during, and after the revolution to examine social change and social treatment. Most of these documents offer a colonial and early American citizen perspective, while a few explore broader points of view to derive further meaning and understanding regarding American treatment of these two groups. The purpose of this paper is to expand the current historiography on the American Revolution in order to more fully understand the changes, or lack thereof, that occurred in early America and the resulting social atmosphere for Loyalists and Patriot women.

3:45 PM

An Application of Critical Theory to Twenty One Pilots

Christine Collins, Kent State University - Stark Campus

217 Science & Nursing Building

3:45 PM - 4:15 PM

Critical theory is not limited to analyzing literature and texts. It can be used to provide meaning to many aspects in our culture, including music. Twenty One Pilots wrote a song titled "Ode to Sleep" that provides room for interpretation as it is vague and does not make sense on its own. However, I will apply some terms from psychoanalytical theory defined by Lois Tyson to explain what is going on in the song psychologically and how that is a representation of the songwriter drawing meaning from his own song. I will also apply terms from Tyson's reader response theory to illustrate how vaguer parts of the song can be explained through the listener's own interpretation. By combining these two theories of interpretation to the song, an overall message behind it will be accessed. This analysis exemplifies a dual responsibility between the artist and the audience. A complete meaning is not solely drawn from the artist, but from those observing the art as well.

Kent State's Iconic Imagery: An Analysis

Chris Distel, Kent State University - Stark Campus

128 Science & Nursing Building

3:45 PM - 4:15 PM

"I saw their faces and I could feel their pain, and I took their pictures so that no one would ever forget what happened at Kent State and the trauma that it caused for our nation;" Howard Ruffner wrote those words after the Kent State shootings on May 4, 1970. Four dead students and nine wounded, that was the aftermath of the Ohio national guard opening fire on a student protest rally at Kent State University.

Much has been written about those events but there is scant histiography regarding two of the most iconic photographs which were taken moments after those shots were fired. This paper seeks to add tot the existing historical record by examining the impact created by Howard Ruffner's and John Filo's photographs for college students in 1970 and how those images served to move them to protest in the days following the shooting.

This paper will examine primary sources (photographs, newspapers, protest flyers, interviews with witnesses) and secondary sources to build a consistent analysis of the photographs' impact amongst the nation's colleges during the May 4 immediate aftermath. By analyzing the events which led up to the shooting, the photographs themselves and the impact that they had, this paper will show how the widespread usage of the Kent State iconography became defining symbols of the anti-Vietnam movement.

6:00 PM

Significance of Ohio: Exhibit Grand Opening & Reception

Emily Norris, Kent State University
Wade Scott, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Jordon Smith, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Michael Tovissi, Kent State University - Stark Campus
David Ziegler, Kent State University - Stark Campus

Main Hall Third Floor

6:00 PM - 7:30 PM