Event Title

Distorted Perceptions of Genuine vs. Practiced Personalities: The Impact Theory Analysis

Location

101 Science & Nursing Building

Start Date

27-4-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

27-4-2018 10:30 AM

Description

This study focuses on how individuals involved in reality TV alter their behaviors to converge with the context and the audience. My analysis of The Impact Theory, an interview-based show on YouTube hosted by Tom Bilyeu, found that the use impression management techniques and a high conversational sensitivity of the interviewer and interviewee were often apparent, as was involuntary nonverbal leakage when considering bodily communication. These behaviors, more often than not, aren't as commonly observed in reality, leading me to find the nonverbal similarities used regularly across all contexts. With this research/poster display, I intend to make aware the differences of human behavior in both reality and reality TV contexts and assist my audience in further understanding how individuals react and adapt to unexpected conversational violations. The implications of this research are that it does not consider the array of other communicative contexts in reality, but rather takes a general approach to observing nonverbal cues and how the "spotlight" can influence that.

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Apr 27th, 10:00 AM Apr 27th, 10:30 AM

Distorted Perceptions of Genuine vs. Practiced Personalities: The Impact Theory Analysis

101 Science & Nursing Building

This study focuses on how individuals involved in reality TV alter their behaviors to converge with the context and the audience. My analysis of The Impact Theory, an interview-based show on YouTube hosted by Tom Bilyeu, found that the use impression management techniques and a high conversational sensitivity of the interviewer and interviewee were often apparent, as was involuntary nonverbal leakage when considering bodily communication. These behaviors, more often than not, aren't as commonly observed in reality, leading me to find the nonverbal similarities used regularly across all contexts. With this research/poster display, I intend to make aware the differences of human behavior in both reality and reality TV contexts and assist my audience in further understanding how individuals react and adapt to unexpected conversational violations. The implications of this research are that it does not consider the array of other communicative contexts in reality, but rather takes a general approach to observing nonverbal cues and how the "spotlight" can influence that.