Poster Sessions

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2018
Friday, April 27th
10:00 AM

Comparing Surfaces Reacting with Water

Corey Coyne, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Hydrophobicity is a measure of how well a surface repels water. I measured the hydrophobicity of shrimp specimens compared to other hydrophobic surfaces, such as Teflon. A digital microscope helped me capture images of the surfaces repelling the water droplets. The shrimp exoskeleton was not hydrophobic when compared to the Teflon. This may be due to the dependence shrimp have on seawater passing through its carapace. Investigations into the structure of the shrimp may reveal the nature of its hydrophilicity, or water binding property. To get a clear and even more magnified image of the exoskeleton structure a SEM microscope will be used.

Cytotoxicity of Phytocompounds Cannabigerol (CBG) and Withaferin A to SKOV3 Ovarian Cancer Cells

Ellie Camerato, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Ovarian cancer affects 239,000 women worldwide each year. One in 75 women will develop this condition, and it has a one in 100 lethality rate (Reid et al., Cancer Biol Med, 14:9-32, 2017). Ovarian cancer, as well as many other cancers, are most often treated with chemotherapy and radiation. Because of the nonspecific targets of these treatments, many negative side effects often result, including hair loss, nausea and vomiting, and even increase in the progression of cancer. Previous studies with plant extracts such as cannabinoids and withaferin A have shown cytotoxic effects on many types cancer cells. Therefore, I hypothesized that cannabigerol (CBG) and withaferin A would also show cytotoxicity toward SKOV3 cancer cells. I further hypothesized that both compounds would inhibit cell migration and increase acidification of the medium, which are characteristic of many cancer cells. Both CBG and withaferin A independently inhibited cell proliferation, CBG decreased the pH of the conditioned medium and increased the levels of reactive oxygen species present in the cell environment, and the combined treatment inhibited cell migration in a scratch-wound assay. These preliminary results suggest the potential of these compounds as a possible approach to treat ovarian cancer. However, further in vivo studies are required to characterize the effects of these compounds on ovarian tumors.

Distorted Perceptions of Genuine vs. Practiced Personalities: The Impact Theory Analysis

Cody Silverthorn, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

This study focuses on how individuals involved in reality TV alter their behaviors to converge with the context and the audience. My analysis of The Impact Theory, an interview-based show on YouTube hosted by Tom Bilyeu, found that the use impression management techniques and a high conversational sensitivity of the interviewer and interviewee were often apparent, as was involuntary nonverbal leakage when considering bodily communication. These behaviors, more often than not, aren't as commonly observed in reality, leading me to find the nonverbal similarities used regularly across all contexts. With this research/poster display, I intend to make aware the differences of human behavior in both reality and reality TV contexts and assist my audience in further understanding how individuals react and adapt to unexpected conversational violations. The implications of this research are that it does not consider the array of other communicative contexts in reality, but rather takes a general approach to observing nonverbal cues and how the "spotlight" can influence that.

Effect of Cannabidiol and Koningic acid on Ovarian Cancer Cell Proliferation

Samantha Brown, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Since cytotoxicity-inducing cannabidiol (CBD) shifts the ovarian cancer cell metabolism towards glycolysis, I hypothesized that inhibiting the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) with koningic acid (KA) in the presence of CBD will further enhance their cell death. Ovarian carcinoma cells (SKOV3) were treated with CBD and KA in serum-free DMEM:F12 medium and their viability was assessed with WST-8 reagent. Oxidative phosphorylation status was visualized in the presence of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), which is an indicator of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm). Compared to individual treatments, combination treatment further decreased the cell viability. Cell death was associated with dissipation of Δψm, swelling of the cells and their detachment from the substratum. CBD-induced decrease in pH was reversed by KA. The data support my hypothesis.

Effectiveness of Triclosan as an Antibacterial Ingredient in Soap

Andrea Riggs, Kent State University

101 Science & Nursing Building

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Although Triclosan may be a discontinued ingredient in hand soap today, it is still effective at killing bacteria. Two different hand soaps were tested to determine whether Triclosan as an ingredient in the soap contributed to the success of killing bacteria found on the hand. The two soaps tested were Mrs. Meyer's liquid hand soap which was Triclosan-free and Dawn dish detergent containing Triclosan as an active ingredient. After the bacteria had been cultured for 18 hours on an agar plate, the bacteria colonies of each soap were counted before being examined under the fluorescent microscope. Triclosan proved to be more effective at killing bacteria found on the hands.

Hands-on Geology Lab Experience in the Hoover Foundation Mudroom

Jenna Shinsky, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

With the addition of the new Science and Nursing Building constructed in 2015 came the phenomenal new classrooms and new lab spaces. Among these labs is the Hoover Foundation Mud Room, a lab space where aspiring and experienced geologists alike have the opportunity to cut and polish rock specimens, prepare fossils, and utilize some of the finest resolution microscopes. This lab has been irreplaceable in creating and preparing new lab specimens for study. During any given semester, two to four undergraduate students work part time in the lab to gain hands-on geologic lab experience. For the Spring 2018 semester, geology majors Sara Hoffman, Shane Husk, Hannah Moauro, and Jenna Shinsky have been employed under Dr. Schweitzer's supervision to extract Clypeaster, a fossil sea urchin, from sediment with microjack tools; creating microscopic thin sections of several different rock specimens, and preparing dozens of polished rock specimens for study. Skills learned in the Mud Room will prepare students for graduate school or the work force.

Honey, I Shrunk the Supercomputer: Scalable Big Data Analysis Using a Raspberry Pi Computing Cluster and Apache Hadoop

Thomas Behner, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Big data refers to a collection of data sets so large and complex that it becomes difficult to process with traditional data processing applications or methods, nor can it be managed as a single instance. Big data analytics, of course, is the process of examining these large and varied sets of information to deliver a more coherent understanding of this data, by uncovering unseen correlations, patterns, or trends. Typically, a large-scale data analysis operation, the analysis at hand is performed by a "supercomputer" or several high-performance computers (HPCs) that are linked together to pool computing resources. This schema is considered a "cluster" with each individual computer being a "node" work in parallel to solve problems, or in this instance, analyze big data.

The topic of this paper addresses the planning and construction of a small-scale supercomputer (smaller than a breadbox) to perform analysis on data sets pertaining to employable skills for students entering the technology job field.

Ohio River Flood Patterns

Joseph Cantwell, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

A significant body of water in the state of Ohio is the Ohio River. This flooding of the Ohio River is on a scale set to be roughly every 100 years and in that case, we are due for one in 2037. We should look to the past for historical cues on what to do to prevent drastic flooding like the flood of 1937. There should be a focus to the damage that could occur and limit this by harvesting hydroelectric energy. We can also work on lock control to make sure the excess water does not rip them out. These flood waters will be up to 20% more than the flood of 1937 and could bring upwards of 20" of flooding to cities like Louisville. I believe, by teaching the public and student body of Kent State through my poster presentation, we can mitigate and create a solution to the problem before it occurs.

Play of Color in Bird Feathers

Miranda Sexton, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Coloration in a biological organism supports mating, survival, identification, and other evolutionary processes. This coloration may be due to pigmentation produced by an organism or by play of color through structuring. This is significant because organisms use play of color to produce coloration that pigmentation alone is not capable of expressing. I explored the microstructure of the tail feather in peacocks using scanning electron microscopy to determine whether feather structure relates to the colors observed by the human eye. I hypothesize that microscopic structures of the feathers contribute to the overall color variation observed in peacock tail feathers.

The Effects of Diet on Lipid Composition in Gypsy Moth Caterpillars (Lymantria dispar dispar) and their Subsequent Ability to Neutralize Toxic Oak Tannins

Harry Price, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Gypsy moth caterpillars (Lymantria dispar dispar) produce high concentrations of lysophosphatidylcholine, a lipoprotein necessary to neutralize toxic oak tree (Quercus spp.) tannins commonly found in their diet, hereby aiding their growth and survival on a common host. Nutrient ratios (protein to carbohydrates) of the caterpillar diet may affect lipoprotein composition in the hemolymph. In this study, we reared caterpillars on diets of varying nutrient ratios as well as varying concentrations of tannic acid. We hypothesized that diets containing higher protein: carbohydrate ratios would allow the caterpillars to produce higher concentrations of lipoproteins, such as lysophosphatidylcholine. Hemolymph was extracted from caterpillars, and thin layer chromatography followed by phosphate analysis were utilized to determine lipoprotein presence and abundance. This study provides insights on toxin neutralization of a generalist herbivore pest and offers possible new mechanisms for forest pest management strategies.

2:45 PM

Analyzing Crustacean Decomposition Rates

Kaylee Salaski, Kent State University

101 Science & Nursing Building

2:45 PM - 3:15 PM

Problem: The Fear Avoidance Model of pain specifies that one either recovers from an injury or succumbs to a downward spiral of depression and disability. The recovery side of the model lacks reasoning on how recovery is achieved. We hypothesized a similar sequence of cognition, affect, and behavior would lead to recovery.

Method: Analyses were conducted on an existing data set, consisting of 110 patients undergoing knee arthroplasty. Patients completed surveys before, during, and after surgery. Regression analyses control for gender and baseline pain.

Results: Analyses revealed significant paths from self efficacy to positive affect and vitality-vigor facilitating recovery (p<.05).

Conclusion: The current findings suggest that positive cognition, affect, and behaviors lead to recovery. Interventions designed to enhance these resilience factors should facilitate optimal recovery.

Analyzing Crustacean Decomposition Rates

Jenna Shinsky, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

2:45 PM - 3:15 PM

The arthopod class Crustacea has a widely known and vast fossil record. Despite this, the fossil record for Astacoidea and Parastacoidea, both groups including crayfish, is minimal compared to the related lobsters. A fifteen-week project was conducted to study the decomposition patterns of both crayfish and Penaeus (shrimp) in various simulated clay, aquatic environments. This experiment was conducted to make inferences on why the crayfish fossil record is sparse while also studying how early stages of decomposition could affect fossilization. The experiment was conducted under the assumption that crayfish exoskeletons appear to be much stronger and denser than shrimp; therefore, crayfish would take significantly longer to decompose and would leave a large remainder of its harder exoskeleton undecomposed. However, it was proven that shrimp decompose at a much slower rate, which helps explain the differences in the two species fossil record. Freshwater versus marine water environments did not experimentally demonstrate differences in decomposition rate.

Color Quantification of Lepidoptera

Gabbie Laubacher, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

2:45 PM - 3:15 PM

The purpose of this study was to quantify the color patterns among different species of tiger swallowtail butterflies. It was hypothesized that the more southern species (Papilio multicaudatus) would have wing coloration with more orange, which was based on the geographical coloration patterns of other butterfly species. Three species were studied, the eastern tiger swallowtail (P. glaucus), western tiger swallowtail (P. rutulus), and the two-tailed tiger swallowtail (P. multicaudatus). In this experiment, LensEye™ was used to color quantify approximately 1,100 individuals. The hypothesis was supported, however, it is unclear at this time of the adaptive value of having orange coloration at lower latitudes.

Differential bacterial growth on various surfaces found at a gym

Ellie Camerato, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

2:45 PM - 3:15 PM

The goal of this project was to study the antimicrobial properties of three different surfaces found in a gym. Given the large number of people that handle gym equipment, it was expected that a mix of bacterial cultures often grow on various surfaces. Bacterial growth on surfaces relates to surface roughness; therefore, it was hypothesized that materials from the gym of different surface roughnesses would exhibit different antibacterial properties. Neoprene (coating on dumbbells), textured metal (similar to metal dumbbells), and vinyl (found on the seats of weight machines), had their surface roughnesses measured using contact angle measurements of droplets. The three surfaces, along with a positive control, were inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus, allowed to incubate for 24 hours, then imaged with the scanning electron microscope. The number of bacteria in each field of view for each sample was counted and the three treatments were compared. The hypothesis was supported in that the neoprene had the greatest surface roughness and the largest number of bacteria viewed on the sample. This finding can lead to further investigations on better methods to disinfect rough surfaces found in the gym environment to better protect users from disease.

Lactation Consultants

Veronica Bingham, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

2:45 PM - 3:15 PM

Lactation consultants (LCs) are trained to teach others about breastfeeding and to aid mothers in feeding their infants. The recognize problems, counsel patients and apply principles of physiology related to lactation. This project focuses on who they are, how they are educated and the kinds of challenges they face with this type of work.

Name Brand vs. Generic Brand Cleaners

Susanna Walker, Kent State University

101 Science & Nursing Building

2:45 PM - 3:15 PM

The experiment compared the effectiveness of killing Escherichia coli of the name brand household cleaner Lysol to generic cleaners. Each E.coli culture was allowed to incubate in the cleaning solution and then washed to remove the chemicals from the bacteria. A live and dead stain was applied and the sample was viewed under the confocal microscope. The results of the Lysol and the generic cleaners were very similar. A difference was that Lysol had a slightly higher percentage of death. These results show that Lysol is slightly more potent in killing E.coli. Both can be used as effective household cleaners, but Lysol was slightly more potent in killing E.Coli in this experiment.

Ronald McDonald House Charities

Jozie Scott, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

2:45 PM - 3:15 PM

I am currently doing an independent study on the Ronald McDonald House of Cleveland. The Ronald McDonald House offers families and patients a place to call home at little or no cost while they are receiving treatment at a hospital. They also provide home-cooked meals, fully furnished rooms, play rooms and many activities for the families. A lot of families may not know about staying at the Ronald McDonald House, or even how to contribute to helping. One easy way to raise money for the Ronald McDonald house is by collecting pop tabs. Throughout the semester I have educated people about the house and the different ways that people can help donate every day. The Ronald McDonald House Charities means a lot to me because while my brother was receiving treatment at the Cleveland Clinic, the Ronald McDonald house was a place I could call home.

Using microscopy methods to examine the taphonomy of crayfish (O. rusticus) in fresh water and marine environmental proxies

Daniel Phillippi, Kent State University - Stark Campus
Sara Hoffman, Kent State University - Stark Campus

101 Science & Nursing Building

2:45 PM - 3:15 PM

Several locally collected specimens of crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) were subjected to burial in clay (Edgar Minerals kaolinite) that had been wetted with tap water, pond water or seawater (salinity = 35ppt), with and without bacteria present for a period of two weeks or one week in order to study the preservational differences in marine and freshwater environments. Observation at the macroscopic scale indicated freshwater specimens were significantly more decayed than salt water specimens, and they were most well preserved when bacteria were present in the salty water. In order to study the taphonomy of these specimens in greater detail, claws and portions of the carapace were examined at the microscopic scale using scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was also used to identify the elemental composition of the specimens. Closer examination of the specimens revealed significant preservational differences between the proxy environments. The current working hypothesis to explain greater decay of freshwater specimens is that the salts and bacteria in seawater work to alter the pH and Eh of the water, improving preservation.