Title

Prevention of Osteoporosis Fractures: The Fracture Liaison Service

Author'(s) Department(s)

College of Nursing

Abstract

Osteoporosis, a bone loss disease, affects men and women resulting in weak bones, predisposing individuals to the risk of fractures even from simple falls. Fractures due to osteoporosis have become epidemic in the United States among older adults with over 2 million fractures each year- more than heart attacks, strokes, and breast cancer combined. Over 75% of older women who suffer from a fracture do not receive appropriate screening and treatment to prevent future fractures. The Fracture Liaison Service (FLS) Model of Care has been shown to improve patient outcomes by targeting physicians and nurses to improve patient outcomes in the early prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis. Building a FLS program requires principles of curriculum development. Faculty at Kent State University, College of Nursing, who are advanced practice nurses, are serving on the National Osteoporosis Foundation Advisory Council in Washington DC and are involved in developing the FLS curriculum.

Core Theme

Engagement

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences | Nursing

Start Date

24-10-2014 2:30 PM

End Date

24-10-2014 3:30 PM

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Oct 24th, 2:30 PM Oct 24th, 3:30 PM

Prevention of Osteoporosis Fractures: The Fracture Liaison Service

Osteoporosis, a bone loss disease, affects men and women resulting in weak bones, predisposing individuals to the risk of fractures even from simple falls. Fractures due to osteoporosis have become epidemic in the United States among older adults with over 2 million fractures each year- more than heart attacks, strokes, and breast cancer combined. Over 75% of older women who suffer from a fracture do not receive appropriate screening and treatment to prevent future fractures. The Fracture Liaison Service (FLS) Model of Care has been shown to improve patient outcomes by targeting physicians and nurses to improve patient outcomes in the early prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis. Building a FLS program requires principles of curriculum development. Faculty at Kent State University, College of Nursing, who are advanced practice nurses, are serving on the National Osteoporosis Foundation Advisory Council in Washington DC and are involved in developing the FLS curriculum.