Abstract

This paper explores the size of discrimination in the restaurant industry in Ohio in 1980 and 2010. OLS regressions were used in order to discover the differences in wages between different groups. A set of Oaxaca decompositions, a counterfactual exercise, were implemented to determine how much of the difference could be attributed to discrimination. I found that African American workers made 14.8% less than their white counterparts. Discrimination may be even worse than this wage gap allows: when comparing African American workers to a counterfactual treated with white coefficients, the African American workers make 17.8% less than the white coefficient counterfactual. This effect seems nonexistent when comparing Hispanic and white workers. When comparing men and women, women make significantly less in almost every case: throughout years and occupations.

Modified Abstract

This paper explores the size of discrimination in the restaurant industry in Ohio in 1980 and 2010. OLS regressions were used in order to discover the differences in wages between different groups. A set of Oaxaca decompositions were implemented to determine how much of the difference, if any, could be attributed to discrimination. I found that African American workers made 14.8% less than their white counterparts. Discrimination may be even worse than this wage gap allows: when comparing African American workers to a counterfactual treated with white coefficients, the African American workers make 17.8% less than the white coefficient counterfactual. This effect seems nonexistent when comparing Hispanic and white workers. When comparing men and women, women make significantly less in almost every case.

Research Category

Social Science/Education/Public Health

Author Information

Sophia GreathouseFollow

Primary Author's Major

Economics

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Reynolds

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

21-3-2017 1:00 PM

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Poster

Research Area

Economics | Labor Economics

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Mar 21st, 1:00 PM

Discrimination in the Restaurant Industry in Ohio

This paper explores the size of discrimination in the restaurant industry in Ohio in 1980 and 2010. OLS regressions were used in order to discover the differences in wages between different groups. A set of Oaxaca decompositions, a counterfactual exercise, were implemented to determine how much of the difference could be attributed to discrimination. I found that African American workers made 14.8% less than their white counterparts. Discrimination may be even worse than this wage gap allows: when comparing African American workers to a counterfactual treated with white coefficients, the African American workers make 17.8% less than the white coefficient counterfactual. This effect seems nonexistent when comparing Hispanic and white workers. When comparing men and women, women make significantly less in almost every case: throughout years and occupations.