Abstract Title

Ya no nos crían así: A qualitative study of career socialization of Latina college students

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to identify messages that Latinas receive regarding gender norms, college expectations, and career aspirations. Even though Latinos/as are entering college at greater rates than ever before, only 13% of Latinos/as have attained at least a bachelor’s degree, which is frequently necessary in career development and choice. However, career development is notably harder for Latinas in particular due to culture, values, and gender roles that influence their decision-making. Socialization and intersectionality theory provide a lens to explore the ways in which Latinas’ gender and career socialization patterns intersect. To this end, this study was guided by interviews with Latina undergraduate students from a Midwestern university about a) their personal background and education, (b) messages received about college and career, and (c) messages received about gender. This study makes important theoretical contributions. First, it extends socialization theory to account for the experiences of Latinas. Second, it will provide insight on how messages regarding expectations for college and career are affected by culture and gender norms. This study also offers pragmatic guidance to educators on how to prepare Latina students in pursuing a career that aligns with their interests. Last, this study offers insight into the factors motivating this population to pursue educational and professional goals.

Keywords: Latina, college, career, messages, socialization

Modified Abstract

The purpose of this study is to identify messages that Latinas receive regarding gender, college, and career. Even though Latinos/as are entering college at greater rates than before, only 13% of Latinos/as have attained at least a bachelor’s degree, which is frequently necessary in career development. However, career development is notably harder for Latinas in particular due to culture, values, and gender roles that influence their decision-making. Socialization theory and intersectionality theory provide a lens to explore the ways in which Latinas’ gender and career socialization patterns intersect. To this end, this study was guided by interviews with Latina undergraduate students from a Midwestern university about a) their personal background and education, (b) messages received about college and career, and (c) messages received about gender.

Keywords: Latina, college, career, messages, socialization

Research Category

Social Science/Education/Public Health

Primary Author's Major

Communication Studies/Applied Communication

Mentor #1 Information

Suzy D'Enbeau

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

21-3-2017 1:00 PM

Research Area

Critical and Cultural Studies | Gender, Race, Sexuality, and Ethnicity in Communication

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 21st, 1:00 PM

Ya no nos crían así: A qualitative study of career socialization of Latina college students

The purpose of this study is to identify messages that Latinas receive regarding gender norms, college expectations, and career aspirations. Even though Latinos/as are entering college at greater rates than ever before, only 13% of Latinos/as have attained at least a bachelor’s degree, which is frequently necessary in career development and choice. However, career development is notably harder for Latinas in particular due to culture, values, and gender roles that influence their decision-making. Socialization and intersectionality theory provide a lens to explore the ways in which Latinas’ gender and career socialization patterns intersect. To this end, this study was guided by interviews with Latina undergraduate students from a Midwestern university about a) their personal background and education, (b) messages received about college and career, and (c) messages received about gender. This study makes important theoretical contributions. First, it extends socialization theory to account for the experiences of Latinas. Second, it will provide insight on how messages regarding expectations for college and career are affected by culture and gender norms. This study also offers pragmatic guidance to educators on how to prepare Latina students in pursuing a career that aligns with their interests. Last, this study offers insight into the factors motivating this population to pursue educational and professional goals.

Keywords: Latina, college, career, messages, socialization