Abstract

In the United States, approximately 22% of women of childbearing age are habitual smokers and only 20% of pregnant smokers quit smoking once they learned they were pregnant. Smoking throughout pregnancy is currently the primary preventable cause of detrimental fetal results, such as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and low birth weight. Current research presents little information about the epidemiology of maternal smoking. The secondary data set, National Pregnancy and Health Survey: Drug Use Among Women Delivering Live Births, 1992, found on ICPSR, was utilized to analyze the connection between life factors and likelihood of maternal prenatal cigarette smoking. In this retrospective study, we analyzed mothers on an individual level and utilized questionnaires that were distributed at sample hospitals in addition to select medical records. After a bivariate and multivariate analysis, we found that risk factors for maternal smoking during pregnancy were: race, education, employment status, marital status, the number of previous pregnancies, and number of weeks pregnant before first prenatal visit. Looking at how smoking behaviors change over the course of a pregnancy and what life factors influence pregnant mothers to stop smoking could offer insight for how to decrease the prevalence of maternal smoking.

Modified Abstract

Smoking during pregnancy is the primary preventable cause of detrimental fetal results. The secondary data set, National Pregnancy and Health Survey: Drug Use Among Women Delivering Live Births, 1992, found on ICPSR, was utilized to analyze the connection between life factors and likelihood of maternal prenatal cigarette smoking. We analyzed mothers on an individual level and utilized questionnaires that were distributed at sample hospitals in addition to select medical records. After analysis, the risk factors for maternal smoking were: race, education, employment status, marital status, number of previous pregnancies, and number of weeks pregnant before first prenatal visit. Looking at how smoking behaviors change over the course of a pregnancy and what life factors influence smoking cessation could help decrease the prevalence of maternal smoking.

Research Category

Social Science/Education/Public Health

Primary Author's Major

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Osteopathy

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Richard Adams

Mentor #2 Information

Dr. Clare Stacey

Presentation Format

Oral

Start Date

21-3-2017 1:00 PM

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Research Area

Medicine and Health

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Mar 21st, 1:00 PM

Life Factors Leading to the Behavior of Maternal Prenatal Smoking

In the United States, approximately 22% of women of childbearing age are habitual smokers and only 20% of pregnant smokers quit smoking once they learned they were pregnant. Smoking throughout pregnancy is currently the primary preventable cause of detrimental fetal results, such as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and low birth weight. Current research presents little information about the epidemiology of maternal smoking. The secondary data set, National Pregnancy and Health Survey: Drug Use Among Women Delivering Live Births, 1992, found on ICPSR, was utilized to analyze the connection between life factors and likelihood of maternal prenatal cigarette smoking. In this retrospective study, we analyzed mothers on an individual level and utilized questionnaires that were distributed at sample hospitals in addition to select medical records. After a bivariate and multivariate analysis, we found that risk factors for maternal smoking during pregnancy were: race, education, employment status, marital status, the number of previous pregnancies, and number of weeks pregnant before first prenatal visit. Looking at how smoking behaviors change over the course of a pregnancy and what life factors influence pregnant mothers to stop smoking could offer insight for how to decrease the prevalence of maternal smoking.