Abstract

Prior research suggests that neighborhood context contributes to an individual’s access to healthcare. This study expands upon prior research by exploring associations between perceived neighborhood quality and healthcare access and utilization, particularly during midlife. Midlife is an essential time to consider healthcare utilization as midlife is when adults experience the health consequences of poor health behaviors and chronic conditions emerge. Based on prior studies, I hypothesize that those who perceive their neighborhood more favorably will also report greater access to healthcare and greater healthcare utilization. Data are from the second wave of the Midlife in United States Survey (MIDUS II). Respondents include 7.105 men and women between the ages of 34 and 84 (Mage=56). Participants responded to four items related to perceived neighborhood quality such as “can call a neighbor for help if needed” using a 4-point scale ranging from 1 (a lot) to 4 (not at all). Participants also responded yes or no to a series of items about healthcare access and utilization including items such as “Was there a time in the past 12 months when you needed healthcare but could not get it?” Lastly, participants provided demographic information. All analyses will control for the demographics including gender, education, and availability of health insurance. To test the hypothesis, I will examine the associations between perceived neighborhood quality and healthcare utilization and access in the whole sample as well as specifically for those in midlife (40-60 years). Findings may inform various areas about the need to increase access to healthcare.

Modified Abstract

Prior research suggests that neighborhood context contributes to an individual’s access to healthcare. This study expands upon prior research by exploring associations between perceived neighborhood quality and healthcare access and utilization. Based on prior studies, I hypothesize that those who perceive their neighborhood more favorably will also report greater access to healthcare. Data are from the second wave of the Midlife in United States Survey (MIDUS II). Respondents include 7,105 men and women (Mage =56). Participants responded perceived neighborhood and a series of items about healthcare access and utilization. Lastly, participants provided demographic information. All analyses will control for demographics including gender, education, and availability of health insurance. To test the hypothesis, I will examine the associations between perceived neighborhood quality and healthcare utilization.

Research Category

Social Science/Education/Public Health

Primary Author's Major

Speech Pathology & Audiology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Kelly Cichy

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

2017 1:00 PM

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Research Area

Other Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Mar 21st, 1:00 PM

Access to Healthcare and Perceived Neighborhood Quality

Prior research suggests that neighborhood context contributes to an individual’s access to healthcare. This study expands upon prior research by exploring associations between perceived neighborhood quality and healthcare access and utilization, particularly during midlife. Midlife is an essential time to consider healthcare utilization as midlife is when adults experience the health consequences of poor health behaviors and chronic conditions emerge. Based on prior studies, I hypothesize that those who perceive their neighborhood more favorably will also report greater access to healthcare and greater healthcare utilization. Data are from the second wave of the Midlife in United States Survey (MIDUS II). Respondents include 7.105 men and women between the ages of 34 and 84 (Mage=56). Participants responded to four items related to perceived neighborhood quality such as “can call a neighbor for help if needed” using a 4-point scale ranging from 1 (a lot) to 4 (not at all). Participants also responded yes or no to a series of items about healthcare access and utilization including items such as “Was there a time in the past 12 months when you needed healthcare but could not get it?” Lastly, participants provided demographic information. All analyses will control for the demographics including gender, education, and availability of health insurance. To test the hypothesis, I will examine the associations between perceived neighborhood quality and healthcare utilization and access in the whole sample as well as specifically for those in midlife (40-60 years). Findings may inform various areas about the need to increase access to healthcare.