Abstract Title

How Exercise Influences Speech Fluency in Individuals Who Stutter

Abstract

This case study of a person who stutters (PWS) assesses the effect that short bouts of exercise have on speech fluency in a subsequent speech task. By comparing the effects of a bout of exercise with intervals, to a sedentary condition, during a speech task, we will be able to see how speech fluency, physiological arousal (e.g., heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and electrodermal activity (EDA)), and self-reports of stress are all impacted. The experimental tasks consisted of an exercise and a sedentary condition on two separate days. After the participant rode a stationary bike for the exercise condition and watched a television show for the sedentary condition, the PWS was asked to prepare and deliver a short speech. Autonomic arousal and self-reports of stress were measured during certain time periods of the experimental paradigms to show change across task demands and conditions. Speech fluency was measured during the speaking tasks the PWS completed at the end of each condition. Findings indicated that stress reactivity, HR, and stuttering difficulty had a positive relationship. Contrary to what was expected, the participant had more disfluencies during the speaking task after the exercise condition than the sedentary condition. Further research is being done to examine this effect and to help expand upon pre-existing knowledge of what influences stuttering and may reveal potential new approaches to stuttering treatment.

Modified Abstract

This case study of a person who stutters assesses the effect that short bouts of exercise have on speech fluency in a subsequent speech task. By comparing the effects of a bout of exercise with intervals, to a sedentary condition, during a speech, we will be able to see how speech fluency is impacted. After the participant rode a stationary bike for the exercise condition and watched a television show for the sedentary condition, the participant was asked to prepare and deliver a short speech. Speech fluency, autonomic arousal and self-reports of stress were measured. Stress reactivity, heart rate, and stuttering difficulty had a positive relationship. Results showed more disfluencies after the exercise condition. Further research is being done to expand upon what influences stuttering.

Research Category

Social Science/Education/Public Health

Primary Author's Major

Speech Pathology & Audiology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Hayley S. Arnold

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

21-3-2017 1:00 PM

Research Area

Speech Pathology and Audiology

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Mar 21st, 1:00 PM

How Exercise Influences Speech Fluency in Individuals Who Stutter

This case study of a person who stutters (PWS) assesses the effect that short bouts of exercise have on speech fluency in a subsequent speech task. By comparing the effects of a bout of exercise with intervals, to a sedentary condition, during a speech task, we will be able to see how speech fluency, physiological arousal (e.g., heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and electrodermal activity (EDA)), and self-reports of stress are all impacted. The experimental tasks consisted of an exercise and a sedentary condition on two separate days. After the participant rode a stationary bike for the exercise condition and watched a television show for the sedentary condition, the PWS was asked to prepare and deliver a short speech. Autonomic arousal and self-reports of stress were measured during certain time periods of the experimental paradigms to show change across task demands and conditions. Speech fluency was measured during the speaking tasks the PWS completed at the end of each condition. Findings indicated that stress reactivity, HR, and stuttering difficulty had a positive relationship. Contrary to what was expected, the participant had more disfluencies during the speaking task after the exercise condition than the sedentary condition. Further research is being done to examine this effect and to help expand upon pre-existing knowledge of what influences stuttering and may reveal potential new approaches to stuttering treatment.