Abstract Title

Assessing Changes in Criminalistic Thinking

Abstract

Distorted thinking has been linked to individuals that exhibit criminogenic behavior. In our research, the participants were felons (M age = 30). Each of the participants enrolled in a treatment program at NEOCAP (Northeast Ohio Community Alternative Program). We measured the change in criminogenic thinking of 1,204 participants after completing the correctional facility's CBT program by administering the How I Think Questionnaire (HIT) (Barriga & Gibbs, 1996). Each resident completed the questionnaire at the beginning of their treatment and those that completed the treatment program completed a second HIT assessment post treatment. We predict that residents completing the treatment will exhibit less cognitive distortion and more positive thinking.

Modified Abstract

Participants participated in treatment at NEOCAP (Northeast Ohio Community Alternative Program) and completed the How I Think Questionnaire (HIT) (Barriga & Gibbs, 1996) before and after treatment. We predict that residents completing the treatment will exhibit less cognitive distortion and more positive thinking.

Research Category

Psychology

Primary Author's Major

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Marna Drum

Mentor #2 Information

Dr. Bryan Jones

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

21-3-2017 1:00 PM

Bio Sketch and Headshot.pdf (133 kB)
Bio Sketch and Head Shot Photo

Research Area

Cognitive Psychology | Criminology | Psychology | Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Mar 21st, 1:00 PM

Assessing Changes in Criminalistic Thinking

Distorted thinking has been linked to individuals that exhibit criminogenic behavior. In our research, the participants were felons (M age = 30). Each of the participants enrolled in a treatment program at NEOCAP (Northeast Ohio Community Alternative Program). We measured the change in criminogenic thinking of 1,204 participants after completing the correctional facility's CBT program by administering the How I Think Questionnaire (HIT) (Barriga & Gibbs, 1996). Each resident completed the questionnaire at the beginning of their treatment and those that completed the treatment program completed a second HIT assessment post treatment. We predict that residents completing the treatment will exhibit less cognitive distortion and more positive thinking.