Abstract

There is an association that can be observed between PTSD and the severity of substance abuse disorders in those individuals who experience a traumatic event (Peirce et al., 2008). However, we aim to investigate if there is a relationship between gender and substance abuse when an individual experiences an interpersonal trauma. Prior research does suggest that women are more susceptible than men to develop PTSD (Peirce et al., 2008). In presence of interpersonal trauma history (sexual assault, physical assault, physical assault with a weapon), does gender influence frequency substance abuse?

This sample was collected through an inpatient detox center for individual’s presenting with a substance use problem. Cognitive assessments and questionnaires about past trauma and substance use history were administered to the participants at the detox center. The questionnaire asked about different types of trauma, such as physical or sexual assault, and the degree of exposure (i.e. “happened to you” or if “you witnessed it”).

Given the relationship shown between PTSD and substance use (Dansky et al., 1996), we expect to replicate this relationship for PTSD and substance use in this sample but we hypothesize that gender will not impact these variables. Understanding the potential gender differences within substance and trauma may better inform whether treatment approaches should be tailored by gender for interpersonal trauma. Data collection is ongoing at this point. Results will be provided at the poster presentation.

Modified Abstract

A significant link between PTSD and substance abuse has been shown in recent literature. However, we aim to investigate if there is a relationship between gender and substance abuse when that individual experiences an interpersonal trauma. In presence of interpersonal trauma history (sexual assault, physical assault, physical assault with a weapon), does gender influence frequency substance abuse? We hypothesize that there will not be a difference between gender and substance abuse for individuals that were exposed to an interpersonal trauma. Understanding the potential gender differences within substance and trauma may better inform whether treatment approaches should be tailored by gender for interpersonal trauma.

Research Category

Psychology

Author Information

Rebecca JordanFollow

Primary Author's Major

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Ms. Angela Junglen

Mentor #2 Information

Dr. Douglas Delahanty

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

21-3-2017 1:00 PM

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Poster

Research Area

Clinical Psychology | Cognitive Psychology | Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Mar 21st, 1:00 PM

Substance Abuse Influenced by Gender and Interpersonal Trauma

There is an association that can be observed between PTSD and the severity of substance abuse disorders in those individuals who experience a traumatic event (Peirce et al., 2008). However, we aim to investigate if there is a relationship between gender and substance abuse when an individual experiences an interpersonal trauma. Prior research does suggest that women are more susceptible than men to develop PTSD (Peirce et al., 2008). In presence of interpersonal trauma history (sexual assault, physical assault, physical assault with a weapon), does gender influence frequency substance abuse?

This sample was collected through an inpatient detox center for individual’s presenting with a substance use problem. Cognitive assessments and questionnaires about past trauma and substance use history were administered to the participants at the detox center. The questionnaire asked about different types of trauma, such as physical or sexual assault, and the degree of exposure (i.e. “happened to you” or if “you witnessed it”).

Given the relationship shown between PTSD and substance use (Dansky et al., 1996), we expect to replicate this relationship for PTSD and substance use in this sample but we hypothesize that gender will not impact these variables. Understanding the potential gender differences within substance and trauma may better inform whether treatment approaches should be tailored by gender for interpersonal trauma. Data collection is ongoing at this point. Results will be provided at the poster presentation.