Abstract

This study examined gender differences between mothers and fathers in exposure to parenting stressors. To examine parental gender differences between mothers and fathers in exposure to parenting stressors I will use a t-test. This study also examines reactivity to parenting stressors by examining associations between parents’ parenting stressors and their health and well-being. To examine the correlations between parents’ marital status, number of children, parenting stressors, daily negative affect, and physical symptoms we will use a regression analyses. Participants included 1,118 individuals who identified as parents (N=1,118 from the Midlife in the United States Survey (MIDUS II) and the National Study of Daily Experiences (NSDE II)). Participants ages ranged from 33 to 84 years old. Respondents self-reported their physical health and mental/emotional health, marital status, and number of children. For a series of eight days, respondents also reported on the stressors they experienced that involved their children (i.e., parenting stressors) as well as their negative affect and physical health symptoms. This study suggests that there are gender differences between mothers and fathers in exposure to parenting stressors. This study also suggests that parenting stressors can effect parents’ health and well-being depending on the parents’ marital status, age, and number of children.

Modified Abstract

This study examined gender differences between mothers and fathers in exposure to parenting stressors. This study also examines reactivity to parenting stressors by examining associations between parents’ parenting stressors and their health and well-being. Participants included 1,118 individuals who identified as parents (N=1,118 from the Midlife in the United States Survey (MIDUS II) and the National Study of Daily Experiences (NSDE II)). Participants ages ranged from 33 to 84 years old. Respondents self-reported their physical health and mental/emotional health, marital status, and number of children. For a series of eight days, respondents also reported on the stressors they experienced that involved their children (i.e., parenting stressors) as well as their negative affect and physical health symptoms.

Research Category

Psychology

Author Information

Nabria BeasleyFollow

Primary Author's Major

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Kelly Cichy

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

2017 1:00 PM

Research Area

Psychology

Included in

Psychology Commons

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Mar 21st, 1:00 PM

Gender Differences between Mothers and Fathers in Exposure and Reactivity to Parenting Stressors

This study examined gender differences between mothers and fathers in exposure to parenting stressors. To examine parental gender differences between mothers and fathers in exposure to parenting stressors I will use a t-test. This study also examines reactivity to parenting stressors by examining associations between parents’ parenting stressors and their health and well-being. To examine the correlations between parents’ marital status, number of children, parenting stressors, daily negative affect, and physical symptoms we will use a regression analyses. Participants included 1,118 individuals who identified as parents (N=1,118 from the Midlife in the United States Survey (MIDUS II) and the National Study of Daily Experiences (NSDE II)). Participants ages ranged from 33 to 84 years old. Respondents self-reported their physical health and mental/emotional health, marital status, and number of children. For a series of eight days, respondents also reported on the stressors they experienced that involved their children (i.e., parenting stressors) as well as their negative affect and physical health symptoms. This study suggests that there are gender differences between mothers and fathers in exposure to parenting stressors. This study also suggests that parenting stressors can effect parents’ health and well-being depending on the parents’ marital status, age, and number of children.