Abstract

Increasingly, mobile applications are becoming a useful tool in behavioral health interventions. Whereas a number of tools have been developed for use with adult populations, apps specifically designed for youth and minority populations are sorely lacking. In this study we examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a musical cognitive restructuring app to assist Black adolescent girls in managing their negative thoughts. We hypothesized that girls would like the idea of an app, find it helpful to reduce anxiety, and use it on a daily basis to manage negative thoughts. Eighty-eight girls were enrolled in the Sisters United Now (S.U.N.) anxiety intervention. As part of the intervention, girls were introduced and taught to use the SUN app. Girls’ belief about the app prior to, during, and after using the app were assessed. Data was analyzed both quantitatively (X2) and qualitatively (open-coding). Quantitative data indicated girls were excited to use the app, enjoyed recording their theme song, and believed the app would help with anxiety. Both quantitative and qualitative results indicated the initial app was feasible.

However, data indicated effectiveness would be enhanced by the following:

1. Expanding app capabilities beyond musical cognitive restructuring

2. Development of an app that could be placed on girls’ smart phone

3. Development of an internal social media presence

4. Integration of the app with all sessions of the SUN program

Based on this information, the app was upgraded. Effectiveness and feasibility of the upgraded version is currently being assessed.

Modified Abstract

Mobile applications have become useful tools in behavioral health interventions. While several applications have been developed for adults, apps for youth and minority populations are sorely lacking. This study examined the feasibility and effectiveness of a musical cognitive restructuring app for managing negative thoughts. We hypothesized that youth would like the idea of an app, find it helpful to reduce anxiety, and use it daily. Eighty-eight girls were enrolled in the Sisters United Now (S.U.N.) anxiety intervention. During the intervention, girls were introduced and taught to use the SUN app. Quantitative data indicated girls were excited to use the app, enjoyed recording their song, and believed the app would help with anxiety. Both quantitative and qualitative results indicated the initial app was feasible.

Research Category

Psychology

Primary Author's Major

Psychology

Mentor #1 Information

Delilah Ellzey

Mentor #2 Information

Benjamin Siglow

Mentor #3 Information

Kallie Petitti

Mentor #4 Information

Dr. Angel Neal-Barnett

Mentor #5 Information

Elizabeth Jean

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

21-3-2017 1:00 PM

Research Area

Psychology

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Mar 21st, 1:00 PM

Feasibility and Effectiveness of a Musical Cognitive Restructuring App for Black Middle School Girls

Increasingly, mobile applications are becoming a useful tool in behavioral health interventions. Whereas a number of tools have been developed for use with adult populations, apps specifically designed for youth and minority populations are sorely lacking. In this study we examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a musical cognitive restructuring app to assist Black adolescent girls in managing their negative thoughts. We hypothesized that girls would like the idea of an app, find it helpful to reduce anxiety, and use it on a daily basis to manage negative thoughts. Eighty-eight girls were enrolled in the Sisters United Now (S.U.N.) anxiety intervention. As part of the intervention, girls were introduced and taught to use the SUN app. Girls’ belief about the app prior to, during, and after using the app were assessed. Data was analyzed both quantitatively (X2) and qualitatively (open-coding). Quantitative data indicated girls were excited to use the app, enjoyed recording their theme song, and believed the app would help with anxiety. Both quantitative and qualitative results indicated the initial app was feasible.

However, data indicated effectiveness would be enhanced by the following:

1. Expanding app capabilities beyond musical cognitive restructuring

2. Development of an app that could be placed on girls’ smart phone

3. Development of an internal social media presence

4. Integration of the app with all sessions of the SUN program

Based on this information, the app was upgraded. Effectiveness and feasibility of the upgraded version is currently being assessed.