Abstract Title

Nurses on Boards Research

Abstract

A 2010 Institute of Medicine report identified nurses as essential to health care leadership and decision making, resulting in a national campaign focused on increasing the number of nurses who serve on governing boards. Despite these efforts, nurses are excruciatingly underrepresented on all types of executive boards. My goal for this project was to conduct a literature search to develop a deeper understanding of the issues related to nurses on boards to support the Nurses on Boards movement. Articles were found using the CINAHL database, and then were analyzed and categorized on a matrix, which includes basic information about each article and an indication of its “usefulness” in the context of the Nurses on Boards movement.

The articles denoted as not useful in the matrix were interesting and engaging, but generally not scholarly or not relevant to this project. The potentially useful articles contained good research or cited sources, but were not pertinent to my review. The useful articles contained good, pertinent information relating directly to my study.

The consensus of the articles is that nurses need to be present on decision making boards. Possessing qualities that make them compassionate and caring, nurses foster empathetic decisions making on the boards they reside on. Nurses are extremely underrepresented and need to be self-advocating and autonomous to gain position and power on boards. Nurses make up the largest portion of the hospital workforce, but are the least represented on these boards, and there needs to be a paradigm shift to accommodate them.

Modified Abstract

Nurses are extremely underrepresented on decision making boards both in and out of hospitals. This project examined research on Nurses on Boards to determine more information as to why nurses are not present on these boards and how nurses can be more active when seeking opportunities to serve on boards. Details were synthesized into a research matrix which is organized by the usefulness of each article. Based on this process, findings from the literature support that nurses need to advocate for themselves and seek opportunities to serve on boards, since they already have the decision making and compassionate skills that make them well-suited for these positions.

Research Category

Nursing

Author Information

Micah WardFollow

Primary Author's Major

Nursing

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Yvonne Smith

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

21-3-2017 1:00 PM

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Poster

Research Area

Nursing Administration

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Mar 21st, 1:00 PM

Nurses on Boards Research

A 2010 Institute of Medicine report identified nurses as essential to health care leadership and decision making, resulting in a national campaign focused on increasing the number of nurses who serve on governing boards. Despite these efforts, nurses are excruciatingly underrepresented on all types of executive boards. My goal for this project was to conduct a literature search to develop a deeper understanding of the issues related to nurses on boards to support the Nurses on Boards movement. Articles were found using the CINAHL database, and then were analyzed and categorized on a matrix, which includes basic information about each article and an indication of its “usefulness” in the context of the Nurses on Boards movement.

The articles denoted as not useful in the matrix were interesting and engaging, but generally not scholarly or not relevant to this project. The potentially useful articles contained good research or cited sources, but were not pertinent to my review. The useful articles contained good, pertinent information relating directly to my study.

The consensus of the articles is that nurses need to be present on decision making boards. Possessing qualities that make them compassionate and caring, nurses foster empathetic decisions making on the boards they reside on. Nurses are extremely underrepresented and need to be self-advocating and autonomous to gain position and power on boards. Nurses make up the largest portion of the hospital workforce, but are the least represented on these boards, and there needs to be a paradigm shift to accommodate them.