Abstract

Limited research has been conducted on the occurrence of glottal stops, a vocal phenomenon that creates a “creaky voice quality,” in American English (Pierrehumbert, 1995, p. 39). Glottal stops are considered to be voiceless allophones, meaning that there is no vocal fold vibration and they can replace the stops /p t k/ within a word without changing the meaning of that word. The current study focused on finding the most facilitative contexts for the insertion of glottal stops for word-final voiceless stops /p t k/ in English read sentences in Northeast Ohio. Facilitative contexts are specific vowels and consonants surrounding the word-final voiceless stop which correlate with higher numbers of glottal stops in sentence reading. Data were collected by recording participants reading 24 different sentences containing word-final /p t k/. The targets were analyzed acoustically and auditorily to determine whether a glottal stop or a different realization was produced. Instead of a glottal stop, the speaker may use realizations such as released, unreleased, ambisyllabic, resyllabified, apical flap, or glottal fry. The results suggested that word-final /t/ preceding a fricative (for example, in the phrase “boat shoes”) or preceding a stressed syllable (for example, in the phrase “get in”) were the most facilitative contexts for glottal stop insertion. No facilitative contexts were found for /p k/, although glottal stops replaced these sounds in 8/360 sentences containing /p k/ across speakers.

Modified Abstract

Limited research has been conducted on the occurrence of glottal stops, a vocal phenomenon that creates a “creaky voice quality,” in American English (Pierrehumbert, 1995, p. 39). The current study focuses on finding the most facilitative contexts for the insertion of glottal stops for final voiceless stops /p t k/ in English in Northeast Ohio. Data were collected by recording participants reading 24 different sentences containing /p t k/. The targets were analyzed acoustically and auditorily to determine whether a glottal stop or a different realization was produced. The results suggested that word-final /t/ preceding a fricative or preceding a stressed syllable were the most facilitative contexts for glottal stop insertion. No facilitative contexts were found for /p k/.

Research Category

English/Languages/Communication

Author Information

Alyssa FlowerFollow

Primary Author's Major

Speech Pathology & Audiology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Anna Schmidt

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

21-3-2017 12:00 AM

Research Area

Linguistics

Included in

Linguistics Commons

Share

COinS
 
Mar 21st, 12:00 AM

Insertion of Glottal Stops before Word-Final Voiceless Stops in English

Limited research has been conducted on the occurrence of glottal stops, a vocal phenomenon that creates a “creaky voice quality,” in American English (Pierrehumbert, 1995, p. 39). Glottal stops are considered to be voiceless allophones, meaning that there is no vocal fold vibration and they can replace the stops /p t k/ within a word without changing the meaning of that word. The current study focused on finding the most facilitative contexts for the insertion of glottal stops for word-final voiceless stops /p t k/ in English read sentences in Northeast Ohio. Facilitative contexts are specific vowels and consonants surrounding the word-final voiceless stop which correlate with higher numbers of glottal stops in sentence reading. Data were collected by recording participants reading 24 different sentences containing word-final /p t k/. The targets were analyzed acoustically and auditorily to determine whether a glottal stop or a different realization was produced. Instead of a glottal stop, the speaker may use realizations such as released, unreleased, ambisyllabic, resyllabified, apical flap, or glottal fry. The results suggested that word-final /t/ preceding a fricative (for example, in the phrase “boat shoes”) or preceding a stressed syllable (for example, in the phrase “get in”) were the most facilitative contexts for glottal stop insertion. No facilitative contexts were found for /p k/, although glottal stops replaced these sounds in 8/360 sentences containing /p k/ across speakers.