Abstract

In the NASA Robotic Mining Competition, the goal is to design a robotic system that is capable of completing challenging simulations of tasks an autonomous Martian system would encounter. One of the largest obstacles when designing any autonomous robotic systems is localization and orientation. While many systems for localization have been designed and implemented such as GPS and ultrasonic ranging, the conditions of the Martian surface exclude many such systems and demand a minimalistic system. By utilizing strobing sheets of light and precise timing, it is possible to calculate the position of the robot as a function of time intervals in order to achieve high definition localization and accurate positioning, while being viable for use on the Martian surface.

Modified Abstract

In the NASA Robotic Mining Competition, the goal is to design a robotic system that is capable of completing challenging simulations of tasks an autonomous Martian system would encounter. One of the largest obstacles when designing any autonomous robotic systems is localization and orientation. While many systems for localization have been designed and implemented such as GPS and ultrasonic ranging, the conditions of the Martian surface exclude many such systems and demand a minimalistic system. By utilizing strobing sheets of light and precise timing, it is possible to calculate the position of the robot as a function of time intervals in order to achieve high definition localization and accurate positioning, while being viable for use on the Martian surface.

Research Category

Computer Science/Mathematics

Primary Author's Major

Physics

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Darwin Boyd

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

21-3-2017 1:00 PM

Research Area

Robotics

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Mar 21st, 1:00 PM

Autonomous Localization Utilizing Strobing Light Sources

In the NASA Robotic Mining Competition, the goal is to design a robotic system that is capable of completing challenging simulations of tasks an autonomous Martian system would encounter. One of the largest obstacles when designing any autonomous robotic systems is localization and orientation. While many systems for localization have been designed and implemented such as GPS and ultrasonic ranging, the conditions of the Martian surface exclude many such systems and demand a minimalistic system. By utilizing strobing sheets of light and precise timing, it is possible to calculate the position of the robot as a function of time intervals in order to achieve high definition localization and accurate positioning, while being viable for use on the Martian surface.