Abstract

PROBLEM: To date, no studies have evaluated sex-specific differences in response to an acute bout of resistance exercise (RE) on vascular function. Therefore, we sought to determine the sex-specific responses of pulse wave reflection and aortic arterial stiffness after an acute bout of RE. METHODS: Aortic hemodynamics, pulse wave reflection, and aortic arterial stiffness were assessed at rest and 10 minutes after 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 75% 1-repetition maximum on the squat, bench press, and deadlift in resistance-trained men (n=14) and women (n=12). A mixed ANOVA was used to analyze the effects of sex (men, women) across condition (acute resistance exercise, control) and time (rest, recovery). RESULTS: The sexes had similar values at rest and after the acute RE. There was no effect of the RE on brachial or aortic blood pressures. There were significant condition x time interactions for the augmentation index (AIx: rest: 12.1±7.9%; recovery:19.9±10.5%, p=0.003), AIx at 75bpm (rest: 5.3±7.9%; recovery: 24.5±14.3%, p=0.0001), augmentation pressure (rest: 4.9±2.8mmHg; recovery: 8.3±6.0mmHg, p=0.004), and aortic arterial stiffness (rest: 5.3±0.6ms; recovery: 5.9±0.7ms, p=0.02) with significant increases after the acute RE. There was also a significant condition x time for the time of the reflected wave (rest: 150±7ms; recovery: 147±9ms, p=0.02) and the subendocardial variability ratio (rest: 147±17%; recovery: 83±24%, p=0.0001) such that they were reduced after the acute RE. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that an acute bout of RE increases pulse wave reflection and aortic arterial stiffness similarly between the sexes without significantly altering aortic hemodynamics.

Modified Abstract

PROBLEM: No studies have evaluated sex-specific vascular responses to an acute bout of resistance exercise (RE). METHODS: Vascular function was assessed at rest and 10 minutes after an acute bout of RE in resistance-trained men (n=14) and women (n=12). A mixed ANOVA was used to analyze the effects of sex (men, women) across condition (acute resistance exercise, control) and time (rest, recovery). RESULTS: The sexes had similar values across time and condition. There was no effect of the RE on blood pressures. There were significant condition x time interactions for pulse wave reflection and aortic arterial stiffness such that they were increased post-exercise. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that an acute bout of RE significantly alters vascular function similarly for both sexes without altering aortic hemodynamics.

Research Category

Biomedical Sciences

Primary Author's Major

Exercise Science

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. J. Derek Kingsley

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

21-3-2017 1:00 PM

Research Area

Sports Sciences

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Mar 21st, 1:00 PM

Sex-specific Differences in Pulse Wave Reflection and Arterial Stiffness After Resistance Exercise

PROBLEM: To date, no studies have evaluated sex-specific differences in response to an acute bout of resistance exercise (RE) on vascular function. Therefore, we sought to determine the sex-specific responses of pulse wave reflection and aortic arterial stiffness after an acute bout of RE. METHODS: Aortic hemodynamics, pulse wave reflection, and aortic arterial stiffness were assessed at rest and 10 minutes after 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 75% 1-repetition maximum on the squat, bench press, and deadlift in resistance-trained men (n=14) and women (n=12). A mixed ANOVA was used to analyze the effects of sex (men, women) across condition (acute resistance exercise, control) and time (rest, recovery). RESULTS: The sexes had similar values at rest and after the acute RE. There was no effect of the RE on brachial or aortic blood pressures. There were significant condition x time interactions for the augmentation index (AIx: rest: 12.1±7.9%; recovery:19.9±10.5%, p=0.003), AIx at 75bpm (rest: 5.3±7.9%; recovery: 24.5±14.3%, p=0.0001), augmentation pressure (rest: 4.9±2.8mmHg; recovery: 8.3±6.0mmHg, p=0.004), and aortic arterial stiffness (rest: 5.3±0.6ms; recovery: 5.9±0.7ms, p=0.02) with significant increases after the acute RE. There was also a significant condition x time for the time of the reflected wave (rest: 150±7ms; recovery: 147±9ms, p=0.02) and the subendocardial variability ratio (rest: 147±17%; recovery: 83±24%, p=0.0001) such that they were reduced after the acute RE. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that an acute bout of RE increases pulse wave reflection and aortic arterial stiffness similarly between the sexes without significantly altering aortic hemodynamics.