Abstract

Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) are social and group-oriented primates. Like many primates, mandrills utilize self-directed and social behavior, but the function of these behaviors in this species is poorly understood. Broadening the knowledge of mandrill behavior could lead to more information on many other primate species including Homo sapiens. In this project the mandrills of the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo were observed to better understand the role of these behaviors. Each self-directed and social behavior of the four individuals on exhibit –Linus (α ♂), Woody (♂), Eebi (α ♀), and Zenani (♀)—was identified and compared to refine comprehension of the social hierarchies amongst a given captive group. Hypotheses formed were: (1) males will exhibit more self-directed behaviors than the females; (2) individuals with higher social rank will exhibit less self-directed behaviors; and (3) there will be a higher rate of self-directed behavior post-conflict. Results found that none of these hypotheses could be supported either due to small population size or misconceptions on complex social animal behaviors.

Key words: Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx); self-directed behavior; social behavior; gender; social hierarchy;

Modified Abstract

Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) utilize self-directed and social behavior, but the function of these behaviors in this species is poorly understood. In this project, the mandrills of the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo were observed to refine comprehension of the social hierarchies amongst a given captive group. Each self-directed and social behavior of the four individuals on exhibit were identified and compared. Hypotheses formed were: (1) males will exhibit more self-directed behaviors than the females; (2) individuals with higher social rank will exhibit less self-directed behaviors; and (3) there will be a higher rate of self-directed behavior post-conflict. Results found that none of these hypotheses could be supported either due to small population size or misconceptions on complex social animal behaviors.

Research Category

Biology/Ecology

Primary Author's Major

Zoology

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Sean Veney

Mentor #2 Information

Mr. Austin Leeds

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

21-3-2017 1:00 PM

Biographical Sketch.docx (14 kB)
Biographical Sketch/Career Goals

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Poster

Research Area

Behavior and Ethology

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Mar 21st, 1:00 PM

Comparison of Self-Directed & Social Behaviors amongst a Captive Group of Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx)

Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) are social and group-oriented primates. Like many primates, mandrills utilize self-directed and social behavior, but the function of these behaviors in this species is poorly understood. Broadening the knowledge of mandrill behavior could lead to more information on many other primate species including Homo sapiens. In this project the mandrills of the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo were observed to better understand the role of these behaviors. Each self-directed and social behavior of the four individuals on exhibit –Linus (α ♂), Woody (♂), Eebi (α ♀), and Zenani (♀)—was identified and compared to refine comprehension of the social hierarchies amongst a given captive group. Hypotheses formed were: (1) males will exhibit more self-directed behaviors than the females; (2) individuals with higher social rank will exhibit less self-directed behaviors; and (3) there will be a higher rate of self-directed behavior post-conflict. Results found that none of these hypotheses could be supported either due to small population size or misconceptions on complex social animal behaviors.

Key words: Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx); self-directed behavior; social behavior; gender; social hierarchy;