Abstract

The growth of fast fashion has created an economically inefficient and ecologically destructive industry. Consumers have adjusted to a constant fashion cycle of purchase, wear, throw away, and repeat. They have grown to look for the best perceived value without considering lasting quality or the negative effects that those garment cycles have on the environment and the people involved in production. Too often, the proposed solution has been to convince the consumer to accept the minimalist lifestyle of creating a more staple based wardrobe. However, this appears to be too great a transition for the consumer to make willingly.

How can artisan and mass produced goods be approached to form a collection that is sustainable, affordable, and adaptable by the consumer? By considering how both machine and handmade goods have a place within a sustainable, slow fashion world, this collection proves that the current industry can be altered to be more sustainable, benefiting both consumer and retailer. Using personalized goods to supplement wardrobe staples, this collection created knitwear that allows the consumer to be eased into choosing well-made goods to create a sustainable closet. This collection found that a wardrobe does not have to lose its individual identity in order to be sustainable; it just has to be more mindful of where and how each piece was created.

Modified Abstract

How can artisan and mass produced goods be approached to form a collection that is sustainable, affordable, and adaptable by the consumer? By considering how both production cycles have a place within sustainability this collection proves that the current industry can be altered to be more mindful to benefit both consumer and retailer. Using personalized goods to supplement wardrobe staples, this collection created knitwear that allows the consumer to be eased into choosing well-made goods to create a sustainable closet. This collection found that a wardrobe does not have to lose its individual identity in order to be sustainable; it just has to be more mindful of where and how each piece was created.

Research Category

Art/Fashion

Primary Author's Major

Fashion Design

Mentor #1 Information

Mrs. Linda Ohrn-McDaniel

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

21-3-2017 12:00 AM

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Research Area

Fashion Design

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Mar 21st, 12:00 AM

Lieblingspulli: Favorite Sweater

The growth of fast fashion has created an economically inefficient and ecologically destructive industry. Consumers have adjusted to a constant fashion cycle of purchase, wear, throw away, and repeat. They have grown to look for the best perceived value without considering lasting quality or the negative effects that those garment cycles have on the environment and the people involved in production. Too often, the proposed solution has been to convince the consumer to accept the minimalist lifestyle of creating a more staple based wardrobe. However, this appears to be too great a transition for the consumer to make willingly.

How can artisan and mass produced goods be approached to form a collection that is sustainable, affordable, and adaptable by the consumer? By considering how both machine and handmade goods have a place within a sustainable, slow fashion world, this collection proves that the current industry can be altered to be more sustainable, benefiting both consumer and retailer. Using personalized goods to supplement wardrobe staples, this collection created knitwear that allows the consumer to be eased into choosing well-made goods to create a sustainable closet. This collection found that a wardrobe does not have to lose its individual identity in order to be sustainable; it just has to be more mindful of where and how each piece was created.