Abstract

Spanish architecture is riddled with various architecture influences over the course of history. In particular, the influences of Moorish and Jewish styles on Spanish architecture has been present since the Inquisition. Moorish and Jewish art and architecture was coveted by the Spanish, but the culture was refuted and discouraged in Spain. One thing that should be made apparent is that Spain was always in search of “purely” Spanish architectural identity, when in actuality Spain was always a country of many different peoples with many different cultures. This cultural variety brought diversity in what was thought to be “purely” Spanish. Geometries, materials, and ornament from these influences can be seen in their mid-twentieth century architecture as well. However, Spain never truly owns up to the influence of other cultures on their “pure” Spanish architecture. This investigation will analyze references to Spain’s Jewish and Moorish heritage, and it will argue that, despite the anti-Semitic rhetoric, Spanish architects knowingly accepted Jewish and Moorish influence in their work.

Analyzing texts from Secundino Zuazo, anti-Semitic rhetoric of Luis Moya, Luis Gutierrez Soto’s design for the Ministry of the Air Building, and the works of Antoni Gaudi are the starting points at which these relationships between Jewish and Moorish influences on modern Spanish architecture begin to unfold. Looking at how the architects of some of these successful works came about their ideas, what or who influenced them, and the culture that comes behind it.

Modified Abstract

Spanish architecture is riddled with various architecture influences over the course of history. In particular, the influences of Moorish and Jewish styles on Spanish architecture has been present since the Inquisition. Moorish and Jewish art and architecture was coveted by the Spanish, but the culture was refuted and discouraged in Spain. This investigation will analyze references to Spain’s Jewish and Moorish heritage, and it will argue that, despite the anti-Semitic rhetoric, Spanish architects knowingly accepted Jewish and Moorish influence in their work.

Research Category

Architecture

Author Information

Caitlyn McCauslandFollow

Primary Author's Major

Architecture

Mentor #1 Information

Dr. Brett Tippey

Presentation Format

Poster

Start Date

21-3-2017 1:00 PM

biographical sketch.docx (56 kB)
Photo and 50 word Biographical sketch

Research Area

Architectural History and Criticism | Architecture

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Mar 21st, 1:00 PM

Jewish and Moorish Influence on Mid-Twentieth Century Spanish Architecture

Spanish architecture is riddled with various architecture influences over the course of history. In particular, the influences of Moorish and Jewish styles on Spanish architecture has been present since the Inquisition. Moorish and Jewish art and architecture was coveted by the Spanish, but the culture was refuted and discouraged in Spain. One thing that should be made apparent is that Spain was always in search of “purely” Spanish architectural identity, when in actuality Spain was always a country of many different peoples with many different cultures. This cultural variety brought diversity in what was thought to be “purely” Spanish. Geometries, materials, and ornament from these influences can be seen in their mid-twentieth century architecture as well. However, Spain never truly owns up to the influence of other cultures on their “pure” Spanish architecture. This investigation will analyze references to Spain’s Jewish and Moorish heritage, and it will argue that, despite the anti-Semitic rhetoric, Spanish architects knowingly accepted Jewish and Moorish influence in their work.

Analyzing texts from Secundino Zuazo, anti-Semitic rhetoric of Luis Moya, Luis Gutierrez Soto’s design for the Ministry of the Air Building, and the works of Antoni Gaudi are the starting points at which these relationships between Jewish and Moorish influences on modern Spanish architecture begin to unfold. Looking at how the architects of some of these successful works came about their ideas, what or who influenced them, and the culture that comes behind it.